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Hip Implant Energy Harvester

Hip Implant Energy Harvester
Hip Implant Energy Harvester
Failed hip replacements have resulted in increased demand for revision hip surgeries and rising costs in healthcare. To mitigate the problem, instrumented hip prostheses have been proposed to detect the early signs and symptoms of failures in vivo. In the main, batteries and an inductive power link are used to power instrumented hip implants. However, batteries are an unattractive option because of their limited lifetime and the replacing of batteries requiring additional surgery. The use of an electromagnetic inductive link is a potential powering method but requires external drivers to activate implant systems, not preferable for home activity monitoring. Therefore, methods of powering instrumented hip implants by human movement are studied in this thesis.

An electromagnetic vibration energy harvester based on magnetic levitation is presented as suitable for low frequency, high amplitude excitation such as that associated with human motion. The constraints on the size of the harvester are due to the volume of the hip prosthesis which makes designing an effective energy harvester operating at a frequency below 10 Hz a significant challenge. To overcome this, a magnetically levitated electromagnetic vibration energy harvester based on coupled levitated magnets is presented with a nonlinear response, to extend operational bandwidth and enhance the power output of the harvesting device. Experiment results have demonstrated a improvement in the performance of a harvester based on coupled levitated magnets compared with that based on a single levitated magnet. The output voltage across the optimal load 2.66kΩ generated from hip movement is 0.122 Vrms (0.66 Vp-p) and 0.314 Vrms (2.54 Vp-p) during walking and running respectively. The power output obtained is 5.61 μW (walking) and 37.07 μW (running). The presented results demonstrate the feasibility of harvesting energy from hip movements to power the instrumentation.
University of Southampton
Pancharoen, Kantida
1196aa00-5e47-43ba-b407-5caf86d718f9
Pancharoen, Kantida
1196aa00-5e47-43ba-b407-5caf86d718f9
Beeby, Stephen
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d
Zhu, Dibin
ec52eae1-39fa-427c-968b-e76089a464a6

Pancharoen, Kantida (2017) Hip Implant Energy Harvester. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 219pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Failed hip replacements have resulted in increased demand for revision hip surgeries and rising costs in healthcare. To mitigate the problem, instrumented hip prostheses have been proposed to detect the early signs and symptoms of failures in vivo. In the main, batteries and an inductive power link are used to power instrumented hip implants. However, batteries are an unattractive option because of their limited lifetime and the replacing of batteries requiring additional surgery. The use of an electromagnetic inductive link is a potential powering method but requires external drivers to activate implant systems, not preferable for home activity monitoring. Therefore, methods of powering instrumented hip implants by human movement are studied in this thesis.

An electromagnetic vibration energy harvester based on magnetic levitation is presented as suitable for low frequency, high amplitude excitation such as that associated with human motion. The constraints on the size of the harvester are due to the volume of the hip prosthesis which makes designing an effective energy harvester operating at a frequency below 10 Hz a significant challenge. To overcome this, a magnetically levitated electromagnetic vibration energy harvester based on coupled levitated magnets is presented with a nonlinear response, to extend operational bandwidth and enhance the power output of the harvesting device. Experiment results have demonstrated a improvement in the performance of a harvester based on coupled levitated magnets compared with that based on a single levitated magnet. The output voltage across the optimal load 2.66kΩ generated from hip movement is 0.122 Vrms (0.66 Vp-p) and 0.314 Vrms (2.54 Vp-p) during walking and running respectively. The power output obtained is 5.61 μW (walking) and 37.07 μW (running). The presented results demonstrate the feasibility of harvesting energy from hip movements to power the instrumentation.

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Published date: October 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 438639
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/438639
PURE UUID: 4ec3296d-fd8a-46df-bd0f-4aa544aee814
ORCID for Stephen Beeby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0800-1759
ORCID for Dibin Zhu: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0517-3974

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Date deposited: 19 Mar 2020 17:36
Last modified: 20 Mar 2020 01:25

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Contributors

Author: Kantida Pancharoen
Thesis advisor: Stephen Beeby ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Dibin Zhu ORCID iD

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