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Does mental imagery affect paranoia, anxiety and core beliefs? A pilot experimental study in an analogue sample

Does mental imagery affect paranoia, anxiety and core beliefs? A pilot experimental study in an analogue sample
Does mental imagery affect paranoia, anxiety and core beliefs? A pilot experimental study in an analogue sample
Background: Mental imagery is implicated in the maintenance and treatment of persecutory delusions, yet there is little experimental evidence for the effects of imagery on paranoia, anxiety and core beliefs – key therapeutic targets in CBT for psychosis.

Aims: This pilot study examined the impact of a repeated imagery task in people with high levels of non-clinical paranoia, to determine whether a fully powered study is warranted.

Method: Twenty-four people participated in a 3 × 3 mixed model design comparing paranoia, anxiety and core beliefs between imagery conditions (positive/negative/neutral) and across time-points (pre/post/follow-up).

Results: The imagery task yielded large effects on paranoia, anxiety and core self-beliefs.

Conclusions: Rehearsing interpersonal imagery in which the person experiences themselves as safe, secure, and able to trust others, may have large, sustained effects. A fully powered clinical study is warranted.
1752-2439
Bennetts, Alison
1303c39e-68a0-4516-8b77-b553a5e4de39
Stopa, Lusia
b52f29fc-d1c2-450d-b321-68f95fa22c40
Newman-Taylor, Katherine
e090b9da-6ede-45d5-8a56-2e86c2dafef7
Bennetts, Alison
1303c39e-68a0-4516-8b77-b553a5e4de39
Stopa, Lusia
b52f29fc-d1c2-450d-b321-68f95fa22c40
Newman-Taylor, Katherine
e090b9da-6ede-45d5-8a56-2e86c2dafef7

Bennetts, Alison, Stopa, Lusia and Newman-Taylor, Katherine (2020) Does mental imagery affect paranoia, anxiety and core beliefs? A pilot experimental study in an analogue sample. Psychosis. (doi:10.1080/17522439.2019.1697731).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Mental imagery is implicated in the maintenance and treatment of persecutory delusions, yet there is little experimental evidence for the effects of imagery on paranoia, anxiety and core beliefs – key therapeutic targets in CBT for psychosis.

Aims: This pilot study examined the impact of a repeated imagery task in people with high levels of non-clinical paranoia, to determine whether a fully powered study is warranted.

Method: Twenty-four people participated in a 3 × 3 mixed model design comparing paranoia, anxiety and core beliefs between imagery conditions (positive/negative/neutral) and across time-points (pre/post/follow-up).

Results: The imagery task yielded large effects on paranoia, anxiety and core self-beliefs.

Conclusions: Rehearsing interpersonal imagery in which the person experiences themselves as safe, secure, and able to trust others, may have large, sustained effects. A fully powered clinical study is warranted.

Text
Mental imagery in paranoia - full blind ms for resub2 - Psychosis - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 22 January 2021.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 22 November 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 January 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 438942
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/438942
ISSN: 1752-2439
PURE UUID: 517a1464-fd91-4cdf-b4d5-726e1810f3f9
ORCID for Katherine Newman-Taylor: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1579-7959

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Date deposited: 27 Mar 2020 17:30
Last modified: 20 May 2020 01:03

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Contributors

Author: Alison Bennetts
Author: Lusia Stopa

University divisions

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