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Clinical scores in primary care

Clinical scores in primary care
Clinical scores in primary care
Clinical scoring systems are algorithms designed to predict outcomes, aid decision making, support treatment options, manage clinical risk or improve efficiency. The term clinical scoring system is known interchangeably as clinical decision rule, prediction algorithm, clinical prediction tool, risk score or scoring tool.[1] Medicine is not short of these with recent searches estimating that over 250 000 are available to use.[2] Despite the proliferation of algorithms to inform clinical care, this has not been matched with evidence of their utility. The uncertainty amongst clinicians about their efficiency and accuracy, alongside growing primary care workloads in the limited ten-minute consultation, may contribute to low utility. As demonstrated in the linked paper, there is the additional complication of multiple scores being available for the same condition. So how do we decide on whether to use a clinical score and what makes one better than another?
primary care, clinical scores
0960-1643
Dambha-Miller, Hajira
58961db5-31aa-460e-9394-08590c4b7ba1
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Everitt, Hazel
80b9452f-9632-45a8-b017-ceeeee6971ef
Dambha-Miller, Hajira
58961db5-31aa-460e-9394-08590c4b7ba1
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Everitt, Hazel
80b9452f-9632-45a8-b017-ceeeee6971ef

Dambha-Miller, Hajira, Little, Paul and Everitt, Hazel (2020) Clinical scores in primary care. British Journal of General Practice, 70 (693), [163]. (doi:10.3399/bjgp20X708941).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Clinical scoring systems are algorithms designed to predict outcomes, aid decision making, support treatment options, manage clinical risk or improve efficiency. The term clinical scoring system is known interchangeably as clinical decision rule, prediction algorithm, clinical prediction tool, risk score or scoring tool.[1] Medicine is not short of these with recent searches estimating that over 250 000 are available to use.[2] Despite the proliferation of algorithms to inform clinical care, this has not been matched with evidence of their utility. The uncertainty amongst clinicians about their efficiency and accuracy, alongside growing primary care workloads in the limited ten-minute consultation, may contribute to low utility. As demonstrated in the linked paper, there is the additional complication of multiple scores being available for the same condition. So how do we decide on whether to use a clinical score and what makes one better than another?

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 13 February 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 March 2020
Keywords: primary care, clinical scores

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 439177
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/439177
ISSN: 0960-1643
PURE UUID: f161e8de-6f56-454f-b137-ba270b1f87fa
ORCID for Hajira Dambha-Miller: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0175-443X
ORCID for Hazel Everitt: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7362-8403

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Apr 2020 16:31
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 05:15

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