The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Phospholipid fatty acids are correlated with critical thermal tolerance but not with critical pressure tolerance in the shallow-water shrimp Palaemon varians during sustained exposure to low temperature

Phospholipid fatty acids are correlated with critical thermal tolerance but not with critical pressure tolerance in the shallow-water shrimp Palaemon varians during sustained exposure to low temperature
Phospholipid fatty acids are correlated with critical thermal tolerance but not with critical pressure tolerance in the shallow-water shrimp Palaemon varians during sustained exposure to low temperature
Some extant deep-sea shrimp are known to be descended from shallow-water ancestors that adapted to environmental conditions (constant low temperature and high hydrostatic pressure) in the deep sea. During acclimation to low temperature and high hydrostatic pressure representative of the deep-sea, critical thermal tolerance decreases and critical pressure tolerance increases in the shallow-water shrimp Palaemon varians. It has been suggested that these shifts may depend in part on adjustments to phospholipid fatty acid composition and/or metabolic adjustments. Here, we present evidence that metabolic rate does not change during sustained exposure to low temperature (5°C) in the shallow-water shrimp Palaemon varians, and that metabolic rate and acute environmental tolerances are not correlated during sustained exposure to low temperature, suggesting that standard metabolic rate does not affect acute environmental tolerances. In contrast, we present evidence that phospholipid fatty acid composition does shift during sustained exposure to low temperature. Desaturation of fatty acids during sustained exposure to low temperature supports the suggestion that cell lipid bilayer homeoviscous modifications are important in low temperature acclimation. Shifts in several individual phospholipid fatty acids during sustained low temperature exposure are correlated with critical thermal tolerance. Exploring the greater complexity apparent in the responses of these phospholipid fatty acids to sustained low temperature exposures suggests a potential homeostatic impact moderating adverse impacts on nervous system function. However, shifts in phospholipid fatty acids are not correlated with critical pressure tolerance during exposure to low temperature, suggesting that shifts in critical pressure tolerance are related to modifications other than cell lipid bilayer composition.

Adaptation, Caridea, Deep sea, Ecology, Physiology, Shallow water
0022-0981
Brown, Alastair E
e8ff3585-dd26-47bc-bdcb-55eeda5001d2
Thatje, Sven
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533
Pond, David
1997312b-b198-4a52-89e0-e7bfc5aa9250
Oliphant, Andrew
a080aa80-9deb-4e70-aadb-7c0b02600735
Brown, Alastair E
e8ff3585-dd26-47bc-bdcb-55eeda5001d2
Thatje, Sven
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533
Pond, David
1997312b-b198-4a52-89e0-e7bfc5aa9250
Oliphant, Andrew
a080aa80-9deb-4e70-aadb-7c0b02600735

Brown, Alastair E, Thatje, Sven, Pond, David and Oliphant, Andrew (2020) Phospholipid fatty acids are correlated with critical thermal tolerance but not with critical pressure tolerance in the shallow-water shrimp Palaemon varians during sustained exposure to low temperature. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 529, [151394]. (doi:10.1016/j.jembe.2020.151394).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Some extant deep-sea shrimp are known to be descended from shallow-water ancestors that adapted to environmental conditions (constant low temperature and high hydrostatic pressure) in the deep sea. During acclimation to low temperature and high hydrostatic pressure representative of the deep-sea, critical thermal tolerance decreases and critical pressure tolerance increases in the shallow-water shrimp Palaemon varians. It has been suggested that these shifts may depend in part on adjustments to phospholipid fatty acid composition and/or metabolic adjustments. Here, we present evidence that metabolic rate does not change during sustained exposure to low temperature (5°C) in the shallow-water shrimp Palaemon varians, and that metabolic rate and acute environmental tolerances are not correlated during sustained exposure to low temperature, suggesting that standard metabolic rate does not affect acute environmental tolerances. In contrast, we present evidence that phospholipid fatty acid composition does shift during sustained exposure to low temperature. Desaturation of fatty acids during sustained exposure to low temperature supports the suggestion that cell lipid bilayer homeoviscous modifications are important in low temperature acclimation. Shifts in several individual phospholipid fatty acids during sustained low temperature exposure are correlated with critical thermal tolerance. Exploring the greater complexity apparent in the responses of these phospholipid fatty acids to sustained low temperature exposures suggests a potential homeostatic impact moderating adverse impacts on nervous system function. However, shifts in phospholipid fatty acids are not correlated with critical pressure tolerance during exposure to low temperature, suggesting that shifts in critical pressure tolerance are related to modifications other than cell lipid bilayer composition.

Text
Brown_al._J_Exp_Mar_Biol_Ecol_revised2_clean_deposited - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 29 April 2022.
Request a copy

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 29 April 2020
Published date: 1 August 2020
Keywords: Adaptation, Caridea, Deep sea, Ecology, Physiology, Shallow water

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 440663
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/440663
ISSN: 0022-0981
PURE UUID: e86dd614-56b6-435e-8fa6-2600f45416b0

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 May 2020 16:33
Last modified: 25 Nov 2021 23:01

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Alastair E Brown
Author: Sven Thatje
Author: David Pond
Author: Andrew Oliphant

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×