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Mycoprotein reduces energy intake and postprandial insulin release without altering glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide tyrosine-tyrosine concentrations in healthy overweight and obese adults: a randomised-controlled trial

Mycoprotein reduces energy intake and postprandial insulin release without altering glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide tyrosine-tyrosine concentrations in healthy overweight and obese adults: a randomised-controlled trial
Mycoprotein reduces energy intake and postprandial insulin release without altering glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide tyrosine-tyrosine concentrations in healthy overweight and obese adults: a randomised-controlled trial

Dietary mycoprotein decreases energy intake in lean individuals. The effects in overweight individuals are unclear, and the mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of mycoprotein on energy intake, appetite regulation, and the metabolic phenotype in overweight and obese volunteers. In two randomised-controlled trials, fifty-five volunteers (age: 31 (95 % CI 27, 35) years), BMI: 28·0 (95 % CI 27·3, 28·7) kg/m2) consumed a test meal containing low (44 g), medium (88 g) or high (132 g) mycoprotein or isoenergetic chicken meals. Visual analogue scales and blood samples were collected to measure appetite, glucose, insulin, peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Ad libitum energy intake was assessed after 3 h in part A (n 36). Gastric emptying by the paracetamol method, resting energy expenditure and substrate oxidation were recorded in part B (n 14). Metabonomics was used to compare plasma and urine samples in response to the test meals. Mycoprotein reduced energy intake by 10 % (280 kJ (67 kcal)) compared with chicken at the high content (P=0·009). All mycoprotein meals reduced insulin concentrations compared with chicken (incremental AUClow (IAUClow): -8 %, IAUCmedium: -12 %, IAUChigh: -21 %, P=0·004). There was no significant difference in glucose, PYY, GLP-1, gastric emptying rate and energy expenditure. Following chicken intake, paracetamol-glucuronide was positively associated with fullness. After mycoprotein, creatinine and the deamination product of isoleucine, α-keto-β-methyl-N-valerate, were inversely related to fullness, whereas the ketone body, β-hydroxybutyrate, was positively associated. In conclusion, mycoprotein reduces energy intake and insulin release in overweight volunteers. The mechanism does not involve changes in PYY and GLP-1. The metabonomics analysis may bring new understanding to the appetite regulatory properties of food.

Adult, Animals, Appetite/drug effects, Appetite Regulation/physiology, Dietary Proteins/pharmacology, Dipeptides/blood, Eating/physiology, Energy Intake/drug effects, Female, Fungal Proteins/pharmacology, Fusarium/chemistry, Gastric Emptying/drug effects, Gastrointestinal Hormones/blood, Glucagon-Like Peptide 1/blood, Humans, Insulin/blood, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity/blood, Peptide YY/blood, Postprandial Period, Poultry, Satiation/drug effects, Young Adult
0007-1145
360-74
Bottin, Jeanne H.
dbd6a758-56a6-451d-9d59-61e66ab6a70a
Swann, Jonathan R.
7c11a66b-f4b8-4dbf-aa17-ad8b0561b85c
Cropp, Eleanor
1140f6cf-9c75-479b-a3ab-97de5a6d9355
Chambers, Edward S.
40e6a008-c8ff-408c-90f6-edc1c3667c70
Ford, Heather E.
43f13922-548a-4e27-afc9-f24f433ee286
Ghatei, Mohammed A.
280ec34e-3bd0-4c1b-8a02-5fa5b945f903
Frost, Gary S.
6a72e815-6bb1-45be-ae63-2d7aaebee3f6
Bottin, Jeanne H.
dbd6a758-56a6-451d-9d59-61e66ab6a70a
Swann, Jonathan R.
7c11a66b-f4b8-4dbf-aa17-ad8b0561b85c
Cropp, Eleanor
1140f6cf-9c75-479b-a3ab-97de5a6d9355
Chambers, Edward S.
40e6a008-c8ff-408c-90f6-edc1c3667c70
Ford, Heather E.
43f13922-548a-4e27-afc9-f24f433ee286
Ghatei, Mohammed A.
280ec34e-3bd0-4c1b-8a02-5fa5b945f903
Frost, Gary S.
6a72e815-6bb1-45be-ae63-2d7aaebee3f6

Bottin, Jeanne H., Swann, Jonathan R., Cropp, Eleanor, Chambers, Edward S., Ford, Heather E., Ghatei, Mohammed A. and Frost, Gary S. (2016) Mycoprotein reduces energy intake and postprandial insulin release without altering glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide tyrosine-tyrosine concentrations in healthy overweight and obese adults: a randomised-controlled trial. British Journal of Nutrition, 116 (2), 360-74. (doi:10.1017/S0007114516001872).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Dietary mycoprotein decreases energy intake in lean individuals. The effects in overweight individuals are unclear, and the mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of mycoprotein on energy intake, appetite regulation, and the metabolic phenotype in overweight and obese volunteers. In two randomised-controlled trials, fifty-five volunteers (age: 31 (95 % CI 27, 35) years), BMI: 28·0 (95 % CI 27·3, 28·7) kg/m2) consumed a test meal containing low (44 g), medium (88 g) or high (132 g) mycoprotein or isoenergetic chicken meals. Visual analogue scales and blood samples were collected to measure appetite, glucose, insulin, peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Ad libitum energy intake was assessed after 3 h in part A (n 36). Gastric emptying by the paracetamol method, resting energy expenditure and substrate oxidation were recorded in part B (n 14). Metabonomics was used to compare plasma and urine samples in response to the test meals. Mycoprotein reduced energy intake by 10 % (280 kJ (67 kcal)) compared with chicken at the high content (P=0·009). All mycoprotein meals reduced insulin concentrations compared with chicken (incremental AUClow (IAUClow): -8 %, IAUCmedium: -12 %, IAUChigh: -21 %, P=0·004). There was no significant difference in glucose, PYY, GLP-1, gastric emptying rate and energy expenditure. Following chicken intake, paracetamol-glucuronide was positively associated with fullness. After mycoprotein, creatinine and the deamination product of isoleucine, α-keto-β-methyl-N-valerate, were inversely related to fullness, whereas the ketone body, β-hydroxybutyrate, was positively associated. In conclusion, mycoprotein reduces energy intake and insulin release in overweight volunteers. The mechanism does not involve changes in PYY and GLP-1. The metabonomics analysis may bring new understanding to the appetite regulatory properties of food.

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mycoprotein reduces energy intake and postprandial insulin release without altering glucagonlike peptide1 and peptide tyrosinetyrosine concentrations in healthy overweight and obese adults - Version of Record
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Accepted/In Press date: 11 April 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 May 2016
Published date: 28 July 2016
Keywords: Adult, Animals, Appetite/drug effects, Appetite Regulation/physiology, Dietary Proteins/pharmacology, Dipeptides/blood, Eating/physiology, Energy Intake/drug effects, Female, Fungal Proteins/pharmacology, Fusarium/chemistry, Gastric Emptying/drug effects, Gastrointestinal Hormones/blood, Glucagon-Like Peptide 1/blood, Humans, Insulin/blood, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity/blood, Peptide YY/blood, Postprandial Period, Poultry, Satiation/drug effects, Young Adult

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 440761
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/440761
ISSN: 0007-1145
PURE UUID: 28e8129a-9353-49ee-8c50-f6220c2a3e00
ORCID for Jonathan R. Swann: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6485-4529

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Date deposited: 15 May 2020 16:55
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:27

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