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Regional analysis of UK primary care prescribing and adult service referrals for young people with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: from little to very little

Regional analysis of UK primary care prescribing and adult service referrals for young people with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: from little to very little
Regional analysis of UK primary care prescribing and adult service referrals for young people with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: from little to very little
Drawing on data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD), Price et al. reported UK regional variations in primary care prescribing and referral rates to adult mental health services (AMHS) for young people with ADHD in transition from child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS). Overall, considering that around 65% of young adults with childhood ADHD present with impairing ADHD symptoms and up to 90% of individuals with ADHD may benefit from ADHD medications, the study by Price et al. shows that the rate of appropriate treatment for youngsters in the transition period varies from low to very low across the UK. As such, there is a continuous need for education/training for patients, their families, mental health professionals, and commissioners, to eradicate the misconception that, in the majority of the cases, ADHD remits during adolescence and to support the devolvement of appropriate services for the evidence based-management of adult ADHD across the UK.
ADHD, medication, transition
2056-4724
Cortese, Samuele
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb
Cortese, Samuele
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb

Cortese, Samuele (2020) Regional analysis of UK primary care prescribing and adult service referrals for young people with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: from little to very little. BJPsych Open, 6 (3), [e43]. (doi:10.1192/bjo.2020.28).

Record type: Editorial

Abstract

Drawing on data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD), Price et al. reported UK regional variations in primary care prescribing and referral rates to adult mental health services (AMHS) for young people with ADHD in transition from child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS). Overall, considering that around 65% of young adults with childhood ADHD present with impairing ADHD symptoms and up to 90% of individuals with ADHD may benefit from ADHD medications, the study by Price et al. shows that the rate of appropriate treatment for youngsters in the transition period varies from low to very low across the UK. As such, there is a continuous need for education/training for patients, their families, mental health professionals, and commissioners, to eradicate the misconception that, in the majority of the cases, ADHD remits during adolescence and to support the devolvement of appropriate services for the evidence based-management of adult ADHD across the UK.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 30 April 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 April 2020
Keywords: ADHD, medication, transition

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 440923
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/440923
ISSN: 2056-4724
PURE UUID: d806864e-5354-4851-9ab3-5e09e42a99ee
ORCID for Samuele Cortese: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5877-8075

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 May 2020 16:39
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 05:32

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