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Cognitive mechanisms in cannabis-related paranoia; Initial testing and model proposal

Cognitive mechanisms in cannabis-related paranoia; Initial testing and model proposal
Cognitive mechanisms in cannabis-related paranoia; Initial testing and model proposal
Cannabis use can increase severity of symptoms and risk of relapse for people with psychosis. Childhood sexual abuse and high schizotypy increase the risk further. The mechanisms involved remain unclear, and this limits psychological therapies. In three linked studies, we examined the role of two candidate mechanisms – external attribution and cognitive fusion. Study 1 examined these processes in a general population sample and showed that paranoia, psychotic-type experiences, and linked distress were higher in cannabis-users, and mediated by cognitive fusion but not external attribution. Study 2 examined the impact of established risk factors in general population cannabis-users and showed that external attribution and cognitive fusion partially or fully accounted for the effects of childhood sexual abuse and schizotypy on paranoia, psychotic-type experiences and linked distress. Study 3 examined these same processes in a clinical population of people with psychosis and found that external attribution and cognitive fusion partially or fully accounted for the impact of gender, age of first use, sexual abuse and schizotypy. External attribution and cognitive fusion may be key mechanisms in the maintenance of cannabis-related paranoia and account for the impact of established risk factors. We present a cognitive model incorporating these processes to inform clinical practice.
1752-2439
Newman-Taylor, Katherine
e090b9da-6ede-45d5-8a56-2e86c2dafef7
Richardson, Thomas
f8d84122-b061-4322-a594-5ef2eb5cad0d
Sood, Monica
0f67fd71-b295-4442-9abc-8860ba56decc
Sopp, Matthew
d96b0231-7589-4db2-8cfa-e4f783e1d4c9
Perry, Emma
0950a769-9b69-4930-874a-7b6b60aa855a
Bolderston, Helen
16f36ac4-8a5c-4c51-941f-269a3e50babd
Newman-Taylor, Katherine
e090b9da-6ede-45d5-8a56-2e86c2dafef7
Richardson, Thomas
f8d84122-b061-4322-a594-5ef2eb5cad0d
Sood, Monica
0f67fd71-b295-4442-9abc-8860ba56decc
Sopp, Matthew
d96b0231-7589-4db2-8cfa-e4f783e1d4c9
Perry, Emma
0950a769-9b69-4930-874a-7b6b60aa855a
Bolderston, Helen
16f36ac4-8a5c-4c51-941f-269a3e50babd

Newman-Taylor, Katherine, Richardson, Thomas, Sood, Monica, Sopp, Matthew, Perry, Emma and Bolderston, Helen (2020) Cognitive mechanisms in cannabis-related paranoia; Initial testing and model proposal. Psychosis. (doi:10.1080/17522439.2020.1757742).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Cannabis use can increase severity of symptoms and risk of relapse for people with psychosis. Childhood sexual abuse and high schizotypy increase the risk further. The mechanisms involved remain unclear, and this limits psychological therapies. In three linked studies, we examined the role of two candidate mechanisms – external attribution and cognitive fusion. Study 1 examined these processes in a general population sample and showed that paranoia, psychotic-type experiences, and linked distress were higher in cannabis-users, and mediated by cognitive fusion but not external attribution. Study 2 examined the impact of established risk factors in general population cannabis-users and showed that external attribution and cognitive fusion partially or fully accounted for the effects of childhood sexual abuse and schizotypy on paranoia, psychotic-type experiences and linked distress. Study 3 examined these same processes in a clinical population of people with psychosis and found that external attribution and cognitive fusion partially or fully accounted for the impact of gender, age of first use, sexual abuse and schizotypy. External attribution and cognitive fusion may be key mechanisms in the maintenance of cannabis-related paranoia and account for the impact of established risk factors. We present a cognitive model incorporating these processes to inform clinical practice.

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Cannabis_related_paranoia_revised4_accepted_ms_psychosis (1) - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 21 May 2021.
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Cannabis-related paranoia - revised - accepted ms - psychosis
Restricted to Repository staff only
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 April 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 May 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 440932
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/440932
ISSN: 1752-2439
PURE UUID: e8042246-820e-4ae3-acf8-613f61b00027
ORCID for Katherine Newman-Taylor: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1579-7959

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 May 2020 16:40
Last modified: 23 May 2020 00:47

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Contributors

Author: Monica Sood
Author: Matthew Sopp
Author: Emma Perry
Author: Helen Bolderston

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