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Factors associated with cessation or reduction of methamphetamine use among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (gbMSM) in Vancouver, Canada

Factors associated with cessation or reduction of methamphetamine use among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (gbMSM) in Vancouver, Canada
Factors associated with cessation or reduction of methamphetamine use among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (gbMSM) in Vancouver, Canada
Background: Methamphetamine (MA) use among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (gbMSM) is a pervasive issue, associated with detrimental health outcomes. We identified factors associated with discontinuation or reduction in MA among a subset of gbMSM reporting frequent (at least weekly) use, with a specific focus on symptoms of anxiety and depression. Methods: We recruited sexually-active gbMSM aged ≥16 years in Vancouver, Canada into a prospective-cohort study using respondent-driven sampling. Participants completed study visits once every six months. We used generalized linear mixed models to identify factors associated with reductions in MA use following a visit where participants previously reported using MA at least weekly. Results: Of 584 cohort participants with at least one follow-up visit, 67 (11.5%) reported frequent MA use at baseline or in follow-up visits. Of these, 46 (68.7%) had at least one subsequent study visit where they transitioned to less frequent (monthly or less) or no MA use. In multivariable models, reduced MA use was less likely for those who spent >50% of social time with other gbMSM (aRR=0.49, 95%CI:0.28-0.85), gave or received drugs in exchange for sex (aRR=0.34, 95%CI:0.13-0.87), injected drugs (aRR=0.35, 95%CI:0.18-0.68), or used gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) (aRR=0.41, 95%CI:0.21-0.78). Symptoms of anxiety or depression were not associated with reductions in MA use. Conclusions: Social connection and drug-related factors surrounding MA use were associated with reductions, but anxiety and depressive symptomatology were not. Incorporating socialization and polysubstance-related components with MA reduction may help in developing efficacious interventions towards reducing MA use for gbMSM.
1082-6084
Cheng, Brooke
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Sang, Jordan
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Cui, Zishan
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Bacani, Nicanor
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Armstrong, Heather
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Zhu, Julie
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Elefante, Julian
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Olarewaju, Gbolahan
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Card, Kiffer G.
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Blackwell, Everett
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Lachowsky, Nathan J.
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Hogg, Robert S.
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Roth, Eric A.
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Moore, David M.
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Cheng, Brooke
7ffde375-e870-4fec-a612-44ef912ca12e
Sang, Jordan
c9b86700-43d2-43c3-8d02-0a5a57275d16
Cui, Zishan
298721d1-0246-4602-9120-c626eec8b142
Bacani, Nicanor
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Armstrong, Heather
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Zhu, Julie
24933408-2227-4c23-acf1-ea2c7857a952
Elefante, Julian
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Olarewaju, Gbolahan
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Card, Kiffer G.
4bece098-5a9b-46cf-a64e-615f14acce73
Blackwell, Everett
cd018bc0-abe8-417d-9d7d-c9f91dc25223
Lachowsky, Nathan J.
87634bac-759c-4e7b-9f16-22fb37e87cf6
Hogg, Robert S.
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Roth, Eric A.
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Moore, David M.
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Cheng, Brooke, Sang, Jordan, Cui, Zishan, Bacani, Nicanor, Armstrong, Heather, Zhu, Julie, Elefante, Julian, Olarewaju, Gbolahan, Card, Kiffer G., Blackwell, Everett, Lachowsky, Nathan J., Hogg, Robert S., Roth, Eric A. and Moore, David M. (2020) Factors associated with cessation or reduction of methamphetamine use among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (gbMSM) in Vancouver, Canada. Substance Use & Misuse.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Methamphetamine (MA) use among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (gbMSM) is a pervasive issue, associated with detrimental health outcomes. We identified factors associated with discontinuation or reduction in MA among a subset of gbMSM reporting frequent (at least weekly) use, with a specific focus on symptoms of anxiety and depression. Methods: We recruited sexually-active gbMSM aged ≥16 years in Vancouver, Canada into a prospective-cohort study using respondent-driven sampling. Participants completed study visits once every six months. We used generalized linear mixed models to identify factors associated with reductions in MA use following a visit where participants previously reported using MA at least weekly. Results: Of 584 cohort participants with at least one follow-up visit, 67 (11.5%) reported frequent MA use at baseline or in follow-up visits. Of these, 46 (68.7%) had at least one subsequent study visit where they transitioned to less frequent (monthly or less) or no MA use. In multivariable models, reduced MA use was less likely for those who spent >50% of social time with other gbMSM (aRR=0.49, 95%CI:0.28-0.85), gave or received drugs in exchange for sex (aRR=0.34, 95%CI:0.13-0.87), injected drugs (aRR=0.35, 95%CI:0.18-0.68), or used gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) (aRR=0.41, 95%CI:0.21-0.78). Symptoms of anxiety or depression were not associated with reductions in MA use. Conclusions: Social connection and drug-related factors surrounding MA use were associated with reductions, but anxiety and depressive symptomatology were not. Incorporating socialization and polysubstance-related components with MA reduction may help in developing efficacious interventions towards reducing MA use for gbMSM.

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Factors Associated with Cessation or Reduction of Methamphetamine Use among Gay Bisexual and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men gbMSM in Vancouver Canada - Version of Record
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Accepted/In Press date: 14 April 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 May 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 440981
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/440981
ISSN: 1082-6084
PURE UUID: 447b96bc-6039-41fc-8a4b-1979b30c52dd
ORCID for Heather Armstrong: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1071-8644

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Date deposited: 26 May 2020 16:32
Last modified: 27 May 2020 00:46

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Contributors

Author: Brooke Cheng
Author: Jordan Sang
Author: Zishan Cui
Author: Nicanor Bacani
Author: Julie Zhu
Author: Julian Elefante
Author: Gbolahan Olarewaju
Author: Kiffer G. Card
Author: Everett Blackwell
Author: Nathan J. Lachowsky
Author: Robert S. Hogg
Author: Eric A. Roth
Author: David M. Moore

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