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Breaking the cycle of frustration: applying Neisser’s Perceptual Cycle Model to drivers of semi- autonomous vehicles

Breaking the cycle of frustration: applying Neisser’s Perceptual Cycle Model to drivers of semi- autonomous vehicles
Breaking the cycle of frustration: applying Neisser’s Perceptual Cycle Model to drivers of semi- autonomous vehicles
Semi-autonomous cars are already on the road and highly autonomous cars will soon be with us. Little is understood about how drivers will adapt to the changing relationship with their vehicle, but to ensure safety and consumer acceptance, this insight is vital. To this end, an on-road study in a semi-autonomous vehicle was undertaken with six UK drivers. The ‘think aloud’ technique was employed and video and audio footage of their interaction with the vehicle was captured. Neisser’s (1976) Perceptual Cycle Model (PCM) was used to analyse the data and three case studies are presented to highlight how poor synergy between driver and semi-autonomous vehicles can occur from the lens of Schema, Action or World information. Seven key design considerations are proposed to ensure a more positive and safer interaction between driver and autonomous vehicle to guide focus by manufacturers. Further evidence for the existence of a ‘counter cycle’ (Plant & Stanton, 2015) within the PCM is found and how this relates to the challenges of using verbal protocals expressed during a fast moving dynamic task is discussed.
perceptual cycle model, semi-autonomous vehicles, Interaction design, usability
0003-6870
Revell, Kirsten
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Richardson, Joy
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Langdon, Patrick
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Bradley, Mike
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Politis, Ioannis
3e066508-0573-4b9e-bfdb-3f30ca795c49
Thompson, Simon
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Skrypchuk, Lee
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O'Donoghue, Jim
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Mouzakitis, Alexandros
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Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Revell, Kirsten
e80fedfc-3022-45b5-bcea-5a19d5d28ea0
Richardson, Joy
e2587944-ff00-4a72-bed0-9547b62f95aa
Langdon, Patrick
dbcea6d6-9d1b-4840-b745-2daaaf7598c5
Bradley, Mike
13c46902-142e-4334-9ca8-22538ad3a5f1
Politis, Ioannis
3e066508-0573-4b9e-bfdb-3f30ca795c49
Thompson, Simon
251a3271-54c3-4bfd-af10-9c25aa8f026a
Skrypchuk, Lee
c50ee672-ee07-44bc-83f6-3cbb4ef55d98
O'Donoghue, Jim
69353f56-aa98-40d3-b5f9-d501a7f005e2
Mouzakitis, Alexandros
6b9a6eb0-e893-4028-aec6-0e61c4e900ff
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd

Revell, Kirsten, Richardson, Joy, Langdon, Patrick, Bradley, Mike, Politis, Ioannis, Thompson, Simon, Skrypchuk, Lee, O'Donoghue, Jim, Mouzakitis, Alexandros and Stanton, Neville (2020) Breaking the cycle of frustration: applying Neisser’s Perceptual Cycle Model to drivers of semi- autonomous vehicles. Applied Ergonomics, 85. (doi:10.1016/j.apergo.2019.103037).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Semi-autonomous cars are already on the road and highly autonomous cars will soon be with us. Little is understood about how drivers will adapt to the changing relationship with their vehicle, but to ensure safety and consumer acceptance, this insight is vital. To this end, an on-road study in a semi-autonomous vehicle was undertaken with six UK drivers. The ‘think aloud’ technique was employed and video and audio footage of their interaction with the vehicle was captured. Neisser’s (1976) Perceptual Cycle Model (PCM) was used to analyse the data and three case studies are presented to highlight how poor synergy between driver and semi-autonomous vehicles can occur from the lens of Schema, Action or World information. Seven key design considerations are proposed to ensure a more positive and safer interaction between driver and autonomous vehicle to guide focus by manufacturers. Further evidence for the existence of a ‘counter cycle’ (Plant & Stanton, 2015) within the PCM is found and how this relates to the challenges of using verbal protocals expressed during a fast moving dynamic task is discussed.

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CH9_Revell_Kirsten - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 14 December 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 10 January 2020
Published date: May 2020
Keywords: perceptual cycle model, semi-autonomous vehicles, Interaction design, usability

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 441267
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/441267
ISSN: 0003-6870
PURE UUID: 5eeb47ce-500e-478b-99e9-facd5d353001
ORCID for Neville Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Jun 2020 16:31
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:13

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