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May I Speak Freely? The Difficulty in Vocal Identity Processing across Free and Scripted Speech.

May I Speak Freely? The Difficulty in Vocal Identity Processing across Free and Scripted Speech.
May I Speak Freely? The Difficulty in Vocal Identity Processing across Free and Scripted Speech.
In the fields of face recognition and voice recognition, a growing literature now suggests that the ability to recognise an individual despite changes from one instance to the next is a considerable challenge. The present paper reports on one experiment in the voice domain designed to determine whether a change in the mere style of speech may result in a measurable difficulty when trying to discriminate between speakers. Participants completed a speaker discrimination task to pairs of speech clips which represented either free speech or scripted speech segments. The results suggested that speaker discrimination was significantly better when the style of speech did not change compared to when it did change, and was significantly better from scripted than from free speech segments. These results support the emergent body of evidence suggesting that within-identity variability is a challenge, and the forensic implications of such a mild change in speech style are discussed.
1573-3653
Stevenage, Sarah
493f8c57-9af9-4783-b189-e06b8e958460
Tomlin, Rebecca Jane
d0750182-6193-463a-9d7e-7521d4d34109
Neil, Greg J.
85453750-0611-48d9-a83e-da95cd4e80b3
Symons, Ashley E.
53632c86-8a01-4e04-8dc8-18f54446cd24
Stevenage, Sarah
493f8c57-9af9-4783-b189-e06b8e958460
Tomlin, Rebecca Jane
d0750182-6193-463a-9d7e-7521d4d34109
Neil, Greg J.
85453750-0611-48d9-a83e-da95cd4e80b3
Symons, Ashley E.
53632c86-8a01-4e04-8dc8-18f54446cd24

Stevenage, Sarah, Tomlin, Rebecca Jane, Neil, Greg J. and Symons, Ashley E. (2020) May I Speak Freely? The Difficulty in Vocal Identity Processing across Free and Scripted Speech. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

In the fields of face recognition and voice recognition, a growing literature now suggests that the ability to recognise an individual despite changes from one instance to the next is a considerable challenge. The present paper reports on one experiment in the voice domain designed to determine whether a change in the mere style of speech may result in a measurable difficulty when trying to discriminate between speakers. Participants completed a speaker discrimination task to pairs of speech clips which represented either free speech or scripted speech segments. The results suggested that speaker discrimination was significantly better when the style of speech did not change compared to when it did change, and was significantly better from scripted than from free speech segments. These results support the emergent body of evidence suggesting that within-identity variability is a challenge, and the forensic implications of such a mild change in speech style are discussed.

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May I Speak Freely AUTHOR ACCEPTED - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 24 April 2021.
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Accepted/In Press date: 24 April 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 441281
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/441281
ISSN: 1573-3653
PURE UUID: f627f37a-0abb-480d-91a9-62141dd05d03
ORCID for Sarah Stevenage: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4155-2939

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Date deposited: 08 Jun 2020 16:32
Last modified: 29 Jul 2020 01:32

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Contributors

Author: Sarah Stevenage ORCID iD
Author: Rebecca Jane Tomlin
Author: Greg J. Neil
Author: Ashley E. Symons

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