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Maternal weight change between successive pregnancies: an opportunity for lifecourse obesity prevention

Maternal weight change between successive pregnancies: an opportunity for lifecourse obesity prevention
Maternal weight change between successive pregnancies: an opportunity for lifecourse obesity prevention

Maternal obesity is a major risk factor for adverse health outcomes for both the mother and the child, including the serious public health problem of childhood obesity which is globally on the rise. Given the relatively intensive contact with health/care professionals following birth, the interpregnancy period provides a golden opportunity to focus on preconception and family health, and to introduce interventions that support mothers to achieve or maintain a healthy weight in preparation for their next pregnancy. In this review, we summarise the evidence on the association between interpregnancy weight gain with birth and obesity outcomes in the offspring. Gaining weight between pregnancies is associated with an increased risk of large-for-gestational age (LGA) birth, a predictor of childhood obesity, and weight loss between pregnancies in women with overweight or obesity seems protective against recurrent LGA. Interpregnancy weight loss seems to be negatively associated with birthweight. There is some suggestion that interpregnancy weight change may be associated with preterm birth, but the mechanisms are unclear and the direction depends if it is spontaneous or indicated. There is limited evidence on the direct positive link between maternal interpregnancy weight gain with gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension and obesity or overweight in childhood, with no studies using adult offspring adiposity outcomes. Improving preconception health and optimising weight before pregnancy could contribute to tackling the rise in childhood obesity. Research testing the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of interventions to optimise maternal weight and health during this period is needed, particularly in high-risk and disadvantaged groups.

Obesity, Preconception, Pregnancy
0029-6651
272-282
Alwan, Nisreen
0d37b320-f325-4ed3-ba51-0fe2866d5382
Grove, Grace
20248824-2b2b-45b4-b5eb-f806b705eb54
Taylor, Elizabeth
880bd662-b8bb-46a2-8db1-7fe31bd540ae
Ziauddeen, Nida
8b233a4a-9763-410b-90c7-df5c7d1a26e4
Alwan, Nisreen
0d37b320-f325-4ed3-ba51-0fe2866d5382
Grove, Grace
20248824-2b2b-45b4-b5eb-f806b705eb54
Taylor, Elizabeth
880bd662-b8bb-46a2-8db1-7fe31bd540ae
Ziauddeen, Nida
8b233a4a-9763-410b-90c7-df5c7d1a26e4

Alwan, Nisreen, Grove, Grace, Taylor, Elizabeth and Ziauddeen, Nida (2020) Maternal weight change between successive pregnancies: an opportunity for lifecourse obesity prevention. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 79 (3), 272-282. (doi:10.1017/S0029665120007065).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Maternal obesity is a major risk factor for adverse health outcomes for both the mother and the child, including the serious public health problem of childhood obesity which is globally on the rise. Given the relatively intensive contact with health/care professionals following birth, the interpregnancy period provides a golden opportunity to focus on preconception and family health, and to introduce interventions that support mothers to achieve or maintain a healthy weight in preparation for their next pregnancy. In this review, we summarise the evidence on the association between interpregnancy weight gain with birth and obesity outcomes in the offspring. Gaining weight between pregnancies is associated with an increased risk of large-for-gestational age (LGA) birth, a predictor of childhood obesity, and weight loss between pregnancies in women with overweight or obesity seems protective against recurrent LGA. Interpregnancy weight loss seems to be negatively associated with birthweight. There is some suggestion that interpregnancy weight change may be associated with preterm birth, but the mechanisms are unclear and the direction depends if it is spontaneous or indicated. There is limited evidence on the direct positive link between maternal interpregnancy weight gain with gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension and obesity or overweight in childhood, with no studies using adult offspring adiposity outcomes. Improving preconception health and optimising weight before pregnancy could contribute to tackling the rise in childhood obesity. Research testing the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of interventions to optimise maternal weight and health during this period is needed, particularly in high-risk and disadvantaged groups.

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PNS_IPW_review_13_05_20_clean - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 4 June 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 22 June 2020
Published date: August 2020
Keywords: Obesity, Preconception, Pregnancy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 441454
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/441454
ISSN: 0029-6651
PURE UUID: b7152876-ab8c-4624-a945-30b76be2c7d7
ORCID for Nisreen Alwan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4134-8463
ORCID for Elizabeth Taylor: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7680-2865
ORCID for Nida Ziauddeen: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8964-5029

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Jun 2020 16:40
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 04:55

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Contributors

Author: Nisreen Alwan ORCID iD
Author: Grace Grove
Author: Elizabeth Taylor ORCID iD
Author: Nida Ziauddeen ORCID iD

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