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Gender politics online? Political women and social media at election time in the United Kingdom, the United States and New Zealand

Gender politics online? Political women and social media at election time in the United Kingdom, the United States and New Zealand
Gender politics online? Political women and social media at election time in the United Kingdom, the United States and New Zealand

Digital optimists have claimed that Internet technology, and especially social media, would revolutionise politics and empower previously marginalised groups. The reality is somewhat different: online like offline politics is the preserve of narrow elite of mostly men, while women are still less likely to discuss politics online. This article offers a comparative study of Theresa May, Hillary Clinton and Jacinda Ardern’s political communications. It investigates whether they used digital technologies during elections to feminise politics and evaluates the extent to which women politicians adopt leadership and communicative styles that challenge masculine norms of political behaviour, whether they prioritise policy areas that are likely to make a difference in women’s lives and if they speak on behalf of other women.

Political Communication, Technology, Gender, Comparative Research, Political Representation, Elections
0267-3231
38-52
Cardo, Valentina
87fafbf1-f6c0-4454-a39a-9173d7bd7f5e
Cardo, Valentina
87fafbf1-f6c0-4454-a39a-9173d7bd7f5e

Cardo, Valentina (2020) Gender politics online? Political women and social media at election time in the United Kingdom, the United States and New Zealand. European Journal of Communication, 36 (1), 38-52. (doi:10.1177/0267323120968962).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Digital optimists have claimed that Internet technology, and especially social media, would revolutionise politics and empower previously marginalised groups. The reality is somewhat different: online like offline politics is the preserve of narrow elite of mostly men, while women are still less likely to discuss politics online. This article offers a comparative study of Theresa May, Hillary Clinton and Jacinda Ardern’s political communications. It investigates whether they used digital technologies during elections to feminise politics and evaluates the extent to which women politicians adopt leadership and communicative styles that challenge masculine norms of political behaviour, whether they prioritise policy areas that are likely to make a difference in women’s lives and if they speak on behalf of other women.

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20200603 MAC EJC Final Submission - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 May 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 October 2020
Keywords: Political Communication, Technology, Gender, Comparative Research, Political Representation, Elections

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 441740
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/441740
ISSN: 0267-3231
PURE UUID: afc5b448-5cb3-444a-a20a-ce9585f4c666
ORCID for Valentina Cardo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1993-6058

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Jun 2020 16:45
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:05

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