The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Potential for large-scale CO 2 removal via enhanced rock weathering with croplands

Potential for large-scale CO 2 removal via enhanced rock weathering with croplands
Potential for large-scale CO 2 removal via enhanced rock weathering with croplands

Enhanced silicate rock weathering (ERW), deployable with croplands, has potential use for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2) removal (CDR), which is now necessary to mitigate anthropogenic climate change 1. ERW also has possible co-benefits for improved food and soil security, and reduced ocean acidification 2–4. Here we use an integrated performance modelling approach to make an initial techno-economic assessment for 2050, quantifying how CDR potential and costs vary among nations in relation to business-as-usual energy policies and policies consistent with limiting future warming to 2 degrees Celsius 5. China, India, the USA and Brazil have great potential to help achieve average global CDR goals of 0.5 to 2 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide (CO 2) per year with extraction costs of approximately US$80–180 per tonne of CO 2. These goals and costs are robust, regardless of future energy policies. Deployment within existing croplands offers opportunities to align agriculture and climate policy. However, success will depend upon overcoming political and social inertia to develop regulatory and incentive frameworks. We discuss the challenges and opportunities of ERW deployment, including the potential for excess industrial silicate materials (basalt mine overburden, concrete, and iron and steel slag) to obviate the need for new mining, as well as uncertainties in soil weathering rates and land–ocean transfer of weathered products.

0028-0836
242–248
Beerling, David
a78a8423-d754-4d23-8e4f-7cb5b392dd94
Kantzas, Euripides
fa657466-0420-417f-abaa-8742f115c7ff
Lomas, Mark
0aa8f7f4-81a6-4809-9ad6-3ca67bc88fca
Wade, Peter
3b4babeb-f777-4c46-9004-d16795fc8f6b
Eufrasio, Rafael
238337d4-e7c9-42d0-b679-50c6a5d9b34b
Renforth, Phil
2016cbbb-91fe-4431-9cc9-7c4ba55a3064
Sarkar, Binoy
dacf1aff-41e1-45ad-a881-d18dd75f9911
Andrews, Margaret
6825edaf-7ddf-4b68-8bd0-33c7fb8b8d62
James, Rachael
79aa1d5c-675d-4ba3-85be-fb20798c02f4
Pearce, Christopher R.
c83b6228-0b64-4f5a-a8ad-e5cd33a11de3
Mercure, Jean-Francois
b41c1570-9c90-456c-b067-322a9df30d64
Pollitt, Hector
741d6f8a-0e63-4ddb-a90b-e8d05a31389f
Holden, Philip
6aeb5329-6c58-40f5-9544-98615f19b592
Edwards, Neil
88be5b0f-5c9c-4084-915e-c3f604c07a8b
Khanna, Madhu
367b4cd8-05b4-4525-8758-918dadbecf5b
Koh, Lenny
f6811f49-62be-401f-9456-db3bc2297828
Quegan, Shaun
4b16af5d-12e3-41f2-8dce-df18b638e495
Pidgeon, Nick
92439f35-5dc9-4aeb-9c9a-5f9487cabfc2
Janssens, Ivan
9ed2f7f8-10e0-4402-aecf-923cbfa64269
Hansen, James
7b4fa26a-ddec-4322-b0cd-d0fd99badc44
Banwart, Steven
69a13883-8cc3-490f-9d7d-7dbf438d4d5d
Beerling, David
a78a8423-d754-4d23-8e4f-7cb5b392dd94
Kantzas, Euripides
fa657466-0420-417f-abaa-8742f115c7ff
Lomas, Mark
0aa8f7f4-81a6-4809-9ad6-3ca67bc88fca
Wade, Peter
3b4babeb-f777-4c46-9004-d16795fc8f6b
Eufrasio, Rafael
238337d4-e7c9-42d0-b679-50c6a5d9b34b
Renforth, Phil
2016cbbb-91fe-4431-9cc9-7c4ba55a3064
Sarkar, Binoy
dacf1aff-41e1-45ad-a881-d18dd75f9911
Andrews, Margaret
6825edaf-7ddf-4b68-8bd0-33c7fb8b8d62
James, Rachael
79aa1d5c-675d-4ba3-85be-fb20798c02f4
Pearce, Christopher R.
c83b6228-0b64-4f5a-a8ad-e5cd33a11de3
Mercure, Jean-Francois
b41c1570-9c90-456c-b067-322a9df30d64
Pollitt, Hector
741d6f8a-0e63-4ddb-a90b-e8d05a31389f
Holden, Philip
6aeb5329-6c58-40f5-9544-98615f19b592
Edwards, Neil
88be5b0f-5c9c-4084-915e-c3f604c07a8b
Khanna, Madhu
367b4cd8-05b4-4525-8758-918dadbecf5b
Koh, Lenny
f6811f49-62be-401f-9456-db3bc2297828
Quegan, Shaun
4b16af5d-12e3-41f2-8dce-df18b638e495
Pidgeon, Nick
92439f35-5dc9-4aeb-9c9a-5f9487cabfc2
Janssens, Ivan
9ed2f7f8-10e0-4402-aecf-923cbfa64269
Hansen, James
7b4fa26a-ddec-4322-b0cd-d0fd99badc44
Banwart, Steven
69a13883-8cc3-490f-9d7d-7dbf438d4d5d

Beerling, David, Kantzas, Euripides, Lomas, Mark, Wade, Peter, Eufrasio, Rafael, Renforth, Phil, Sarkar, Binoy, Andrews, Margaret, James, Rachael, Pearce, Christopher R., Mercure, Jean-Francois, Pollitt, Hector, Holden, Philip, Edwards, Neil, Khanna, Madhu, Koh, Lenny, Quegan, Shaun, Pidgeon, Nick, Janssens, Ivan, Hansen, James and Banwart, Steven (2020) Potential for large-scale CO 2 removal via enhanced rock weathering with croplands. Nature, 583 (7815), 242–248. (doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2448-9).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Enhanced silicate rock weathering (ERW), deployable with croplands, has potential use for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2) removal (CDR), which is now necessary to mitigate anthropogenic climate change 1. ERW also has possible co-benefits for improved food and soil security, and reduced ocean acidification 2–4. Here we use an integrated performance modelling approach to make an initial techno-economic assessment for 2050, quantifying how CDR potential and costs vary among nations in relation to business-as-usual energy policies and policies consistent with limiting future warming to 2 degrees Celsius 5. China, India, the USA and Brazil have great potential to help achieve average global CDR goals of 0.5 to 2 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide (CO 2) per year with extraction costs of approximately US$80–180 per tonne of CO 2. These goals and costs are robust, regardless of future energy policies. Deployment within existing croplands offers opportunities to align agriculture and climate policy. However, success will depend upon overcoming political and social inertia to develop regulatory and incentive frameworks. We discuss the challenges and opportunities of ERW deployment, including the potential for excess industrial silicate materials (basalt mine overburden, concrete, and iron and steel slag) to obviate the need for new mining, as well as uncertainties in soil weathering rates and land–ocean transfer of weathered products.

Text
Beerling et al 2020 Author final copy - Accepted Manuscript
Download (6MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 7 May 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 July 2020
Published date: 9 July 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 442331
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/442331
ISSN: 0028-0836
PURE UUID: 5cc77103-c9d2-4ff6-a32e-e5c197e22bfe
ORCID for Rachael James: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7402-2315

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Jul 2020 16:37
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 04:56

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: David Beerling
Author: Euripides Kantzas
Author: Mark Lomas
Author: Peter Wade
Author: Rafael Eufrasio
Author: Phil Renforth
Author: Binoy Sarkar
Author: Margaret Andrews
Author: Rachael James ORCID iD
Author: Christopher R. Pearce
Author: Jean-Francois Mercure
Author: Hector Pollitt
Author: Philip Holden
Author: Neil Edwards
Author: Madhu Khanna
Author: Lenny Koh
Author: Shaun Quegan
Author: Nick Pidgeon
Author: Ivan Janssens
Author: James Hansen
Author: Steven Banwart

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×