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Healthcare-seeking behaviour in reporting of scabies and skin infections in Ghana – a review of reported cases

Healthcare-seeking behaviour in reporting of scabies and skin infections in Ghana – a review of reported cases
Healthcare-seeking behaviour in reporting of scabies and skin infections in Ghana – a review of reported cases
Background
Scabies is a Neglected Tropical Disease. In resource-poor settings, scabies and other skin infections are often unreported to a health centre, or misdiagnosed. Dermatological expertise and training is often lacking. Little is known about patient healthcare-seeking behaviour. This study reviewed diagnosed skin infections reported to urban (Greater Accra) and rural (Oti region) study health centres in Ghana over 6-months in 2019.
Methods
Study staff received classroom and clinical dermatology training. Skin infection diagnoses and anonymised patient information were recorded. Descriptive statistics and spatial analysis described patient demographics, and distance travelled to clinic, noting bypassing of their nearest centre.
Results
Overall, 385 cases of skin infections were reported across Greater Accra and Oti study clinics, with 45 scabies cases (11.6%). For scabies, 29 (64.4%) cases were in males. Scabies was the third most common diagnosis, behind bacterial dermatitis (102, 26.5%) and tinea (75, 19.5%).
In rural Oti region, 48.4% of patients bypassed their nearest clinic, travelling a mean 6.2km further than they theoretically needed to. Females travelled further in comparison to males.
Conclusions
There must be greater public and professional awareness of scabies and skin infections as high-burden but treatable conditions, along with assessment of their community burden.
0035-9203
Head, Michael
67ce0afc-2fc3-47f4-acf2-8794d27ce69c
Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred Worlanyo
11fe21e7-431a-442b-a8c7-6a7cb05176d9
Boateng, Laud
fef98898-6a82-4622-aa70-4fc7e9e066b0
Lartey, Margaret
7dfd5502-c5c1-4d69-8b78-4f03366e936f
Head, Michael
67ce0afc-2fc3-47f4-acf2-8794d27ce69c
Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred Worlanyo
11fe21e7-431a-442b-a8c7-6a7cb05176d9
Boateng, Laud
fef98898-6a82-4622-aa70-4fc7e9e066b0
Lartey, Margaret
7dfd5502-c5c1-4d69-8b78-4f03366e936f

Head, Michael, Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred Worlanyo, Boateng, Laud and Lartey, Margaret (2020) Healthcare-seeking behaviour in reporting of scabies and skin infections in Ghana – a review of reported cases. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (doi:10.1093/trstmh/traa071).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background
Scabies is a Neglected Tropical Disease. In resource-poor settings, scabies and other skin infections are often unreported to a health centre, or misdiagnosed. Dermatological expertise and training is often lacking. Little is known about patient healthcare-seeking behaviour. This study reviewed diagnosed skin infections reported to urban (Greater Accra) and rural (Oti region) study health centres in Ghana over 6-months in 2019.
Methods
Study staff received classroom and clinical dermatology training. Skin infection diagnoses and anonymised patient information were recorded. Descriptive statistics and spatial analysis described patient demographics, and distance travelled to clinic, noting bypassing of their nearest centre.
Results
Overall, 385 cases of skin infections were reported across Greater Accra and Oti study clinics, with 45 scabies cases (11.6%). For scabies, 29 (64.4%) cases were in males. Scabies was the third most common diagnosis, behind bacterial dermatitis (102, 26.5%) and tinea (75, 19.5%).
In rural Oti region, 48.4% of patients bypassed their nearest clinic, travelling a mean 6.2km further than they theoretically needed to. Females travelled further in comparison to males.
Conclusions
There must be greater public and professional awareness of scabies and skin infections as high-burden but treatable conditions, along with assessment of their community burden.

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scabies and skin infections ghana - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 24 July 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 August 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 442741
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/442741
ISSN: 0035-9203
PURE UUID: e0af8f19-ca91-4ee5-aed7-31bff286a32f
ORCID for Michael Head: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1189-0531
ORCID for Winfred Worlanyo Dotse-Gborgbortsi: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7627-1809

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Date deposited: 24 Jul 2020 16:31
Last modified: 27 Aug 2021 04:01

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Contributors

Author: Michael Head ORCID iD
Author: Laud Boateng
Author: Margaret Lartey

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