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Investigation of Staphylococcus aureus aggregates on orthopedic materials under varying shear stress

Investigation of Staphylococcus aureus aggregates on orthopedic materials under varying shear stress
Investigation of Staphylococcus aureus aggregates on orthopedic materials under varying shear stress
Periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) occurring after artificial joint replacement is a major clinical issue requiring multiple surgeries and antibiotic interventions. Staphylococcus aureus is the common bacteria responsible for PJI. Recent in vitro research has shown that staphylococcal strains rapidly form aggregates in the presence of synovial fluid (SF). We hypothesize that these aggregates provide early protection to bacteria entering the wound site allowing the bacteria time to attach to the implant surface leading to biofilm formation. Thus, understanding attachment kinetics of these aggregates is critical in understanding the aggregates adhesion on various biomaterial surfaces. In this study, the number, size and surface area coverage of aggregates as well as of single cells of S. aureus were quantified at various conditions on different orthopedic materials relevant to orthopedic surgery ; Stainless steel (316L), Titanium (Ti), Hydroxyapatite (HA), and Polyethylene (PE). It was observed that, regardless of the material type, SF induced aggregation resulted in reduced aggregate surface attachment and greater aggregate size than the single cell populations under various shear stresses. Additionally, the surface area coverage of bacterial aggregates on PE was relatively high when compared to other materials, which could potentially be due to the rougher surface of PE. Furthermore, increasing shear stress to 78 mPa decreased aggregates attachment on Ti and HA while increasing the aggregates average size. Therefore, this study demonstrates that the SF induced inhibition of aggregates attachment on all materials suggesting that the biofilm formation is initiated by lodging of aggregates on the surface features of implants and host tissues.
0099-2240
Gupta, Tripti Thapa
81131501-352a-489d-bffe-8910035598f5
Gupta, N.
bf5f5d50-ea55-4ef0-947b-ac8d73ee1072
Pestrak, Matthew J.
201ceea9-9ad8-42d5-867b-91565b139327
Dusane, Devendra H.
9a47c5eb-5587-4f1d-bfd4-8548681be2bc
Harro, Janette M.
d04489a2-46ce-4066-9f32-46cbf4bae0ab
Horswill, Alexander R.
7590c3a8-9933-4300-abed-e1b94faafaa6
Stoodley, Paul
08614665-92a9-4466-806e-20c6daeb483f
Gupta, Tripti Thapa
81131501-352a-489d-bffe-8910035598f5
Gupta, N.
bf5f5d50-ea55-4ef0-947b-ac8d73ee1072
Pestrak, Matthew J.
201ceea9-9ad8-42d5-867b-91565b139327
Dusane, Devendra H.
9a47c5eb-5587-4f1d-bfd4-8548681be2bc
Harro, Janette M.
d04489a2-46ce-4066-9f32-46cbf4bae0ab
Horswill, Alexander R.
7590c3a8-9933-4300-abed-e1b94faafaa6
Stoodley, Paul
08614665-92a9-4466-806e-20c6daeb483f

Gupta, Tripti Thapa, Gupta, N., Pestrak, Matthew J., Dusane, Devendra H., Harro, Janette M., Horswill, Alexander R. and Stoodley, Paul (2020) Investigation of Staphylococcus aureus aggregates on orthopedic materials under varying shear stress. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. (doi:10.1128/AEM.01234-20).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) occurring after artificial joint replacement is a major clinical issue requiring multiple surgeries and antibiotic interventions. Staphylococcus aureus is the common bacteria responsible for PJI. Recent in vitro research has shown that staphylococcal strains rapidly form aggregates in the presence of synovial fluid (SF). We hypothesize that these aggregates provide early protection to bacteria entering the wound site allowing the bacteria time to attach to the implant surface leading to biofilm formation. Thus, understanding attachment kinetics of these aggregates is critical in understanding the aggregates adhesion on various biomaterial surfaces. In this study, the number, size and surface area coverage of aggregates as well as of single cells of S. aureus were quantified at various conditions on different orthopedic materials relevant to orthopedic surgery ; Stainless steel (316L), Titanium (Ti), Hydroxyapatite (HA), and Polyethylene (PE). It was observed that, regardless of the material type, SF induced aggregation resulted in reduced aggregate surface attachment and greater aggregate size than the single cell populations under various shear stresses. Additionally, the surface area coverage of bacterial aggregates on PE was relatively high when compared to other materials, which could potentially be due to the rougher surface of PE. Furthermore, increasing shear stress to 78 mPa decreased aggregates attachment on Ti and HA while increasing the aggregates average size. Therefore, this study demonstrates that the SF induced inhibition of aggregates attachment on all materials suggesting that the biofilm formation is initiated by lodging of aggregates on the surface features of implants and host tissues.

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Accepted/In Press date: 16 July 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 July 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 442802
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/442802
ISSN: 0099-2240
PURE UUID: 6087b0d9-a0d8-42ac-bff9-db487ea37a81
ORCID for Paul Stoodley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6069-273X

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Date deposited: 27 Jul 2020 16:45
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 05:53

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Contributors

Author: Tripti Thapa Gupta
Author: N. Gupta
Author: Matthew J. Pestrak
Author: Devendra H. Dusane
Author: Janette M. Harro
Author: Alexander R. Horswill
Author: Paul Stoodley ORCID iD

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