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The association between nationality and nurse job satisfaction in Saudi Arabian hospitals

The association between nationality and nurse job satisfaction in Saudi Arabian hospitals
The association between nationality and nurse job satisfaction in Saudi Arabian hospitals
Background Job satisfaction is important for increasing nurse retention rates. However, there is little research examining whether there is an association between nationality and job satisfaction among nurses. Aim To examine whether there is an association between nationality and nurse job satisfaction. Methods/design A cross‐sectional survey design was utilized, and 743 nurses from three major government hospitals in Saudi Arabia participated in the survey. Job satisfaction was measured using McCloskey/Mueller Satisfaction Scale. Data were collected between May 2014 and February 2015. Results Compared with Saudi nurses, expatriate nurses had overall lower job satisfaction after controlling for other predictors. While expatriates were less satisfied than Saudi nurses about extrinsic rewards and family–work balance, however, Saudi nurses were less satisfied than expatriate nurses about their professional opportunities, praise and recognition, and co‐worker relationships. Conclusion For some subscales, Saudi nurses were more satisfied than expatriate nurses, while for other subscales, the opposite was true. Nationality should be included in job satisfaction studies in countries with migrant workforces, as nationality‐based differences may have been present but masked in earlier international studies by aggregating satisfaction across national groups. Implications for nursing & health policy Policy makers in Saudi Arabia and other countries with migrant nursing workforces should have effective induction programmes that help newly employed nurses – migrant and local – clearly understand their jobs, roles and responsibilities. Policy makers must have sufficient evidence to modify the reward system to ensure fairness and equality for all.
Health Service Management, Job Satisfaction, Multicultural Issues, Nursing Leadership, Recruitment and Retention Add Nursing Policy
0020-8132
420-426
Almansour, Husam Braheem
f7b39e52-8e52-4b64-a6c2-54481faf0c01
Gobbi, Mary
829a5669-2d52-44ef-be96-bc57bf20bea0
Prichard, Jane
64ba5e39-0b0f-4529-877f-aa6ecc7e7e2e
Ewings, Sean
326656df-c0f0-44a1-b64f-8fe9578ca18a
Almansour, Husam Braheem
f7b39e52-8e52-4b64-a6c2-54481faf0c01
Gobbi, Mary
829a5669-2d52-44ef-be96-bc57bf20bea0
Prichard, Jane
64ba5e39-0b0f-4529-877f-aa6ecc7e7e2e
Ewings, Sean
326656df-c0f0-44a1-b64f-8fe9578ca18a

Almansour, Husam Braheem, Gobbi, Mary, Prichard, Jane and Ewings, Sean (2020) The association between nationality and nurse job satisfaction in Saudi Arabian hospitals. International Nursing Review, 67 (3), 420-426. (doi:10.1111/inr.12613).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background Job satisfaction is important for increasing nurse retention rates. However, there is little research examining whether there is an association between nationality and job satisfaction among nurses. Aim To examine whether there is an association between nationality and nurse job satisfaction. Methods/design A cross‐sectional survey design was utilized, and 743 nurses from three major government hospitals in Saudi Arabia participated in the survey. Job satisfaction was measured using McCloskey/Mueller Satisfaction Scale. Data were collected between May 2014 and February 2015. Results Compared with Saudi nurses, expatriate nurses had overall lower job satisfaction after controlling for other predictors. While expatriates were less satisfied than Saudi nurses about extrinsic rewards and family–work balance, however, Saudi nurses were less satisfied than expatriate nurses about their professional opportunities, praise and recognition, and co‐worker relationships. Conclusion For some subscales, Saudi nurses were more satisfied than expatriate nurses, while for other subscales, the opposite was true. Nationality should be included in job satisfaction studies in countries with migrant workforces, as nationality‐based differences may have been present but masked in earlier international studies by aggregating satisfaction across national groups. Implications for nursing & health policy Policy makers in Saudi Arabia and other countries with migrant nursing workforces should have effective induction programmes that help newly employed nurses – migrant and local – clearly understand their jobs, roles and responsibilities. Policy makers must have sufficient evidence to modify the reward system to ensure fairness and equality for all.

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The association between nationality and nurse job satisfaction in Saudi Arabian hospitals - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 27 June 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 July 2020
Published date: September 2020
Keywords: Health Service Management, Job Satisfaction, Multicultural Issues, Nursing Leadership, Recruitment and Retention Add Nursing Policy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443114
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443114
ISSN: 0020-8132
PURE UUID: a3be8cc5-b93f-4bdf-9d0f-a740faa741d5
ORCID for Jane Prichard: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7455-2244
ORCID for Sean Ewings: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7214-4917

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Date deposited: 11 Aug 2020 16:31
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 04:57

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Contributors

Author: Husam Braheem Almansour
Author: Mary Gobbi
Author: Jane Prichard ORCID iD
Author: Sean Ewings ORCID iD

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