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How does job dissatisfaction interact with self-rated health in determining the risk of health-related job loss? Prospective findings from the Health and Employment After Fifty (HEAF) study

How does job dissatisfaction interact with self-rated health in determining the risk of health-related job loss? Prospective findings from the Health and Employment After Fifty (HEAF) study
How does job dissatisfaction interact with self-rated health in determining the risk of health-related job loss? Prospective findings from the Health and Employment After Fifty (HEAF) study
Objectives
Health and job satisfaction are key independent determinants of ability to work to older ages. We investigated the interaction of these two important factors on health-related job loss (HRJL) over 2 years of follow-up comparing male and female older workers.

Methods
A population sample of adults aged 50–64 years, recruited from 24 English general practices in the Health and Employment After Fifty (HEAF) study, completed questionnaires at baseline with follow-ups at 12 and 24 months. Multiple-record Cox proportional hazards models were performed to explore the main effects of, and potential interactions between, job satisfaction and self-rated health (SRH) as predictors of time to first HRJL.

Results
Of the initial 8134 participants, 5143 were ever in work in the study period. Among men, 5.7% and 14.3% reported job dissatisfaction (those in good and poor SRH, respectively), while among women these percentages were 4.6 and 12.9. HRJL was reported by 106 men and 176 women. Men in good health dissatisfied with their job had a sixfold (HR=6.4; 95% CI 3.3 to 12.4) increased risk of HRJL compared with men satisfied with their job (significant multiplicative interaction). Women dissatisfied with their job were more likely to have an HRJL within 2 years of follow-up irrespective of their SRH.

Conclusions
SRH and job dissatisfaction have important individual effects on the risk of stopping work for health among older workers. These findings point to the importance of job satisfaction in reducing health-related exit from paid work among older workers.
ageing, fitness for work, musculoskeletal, retired
1351-0711
36-42
D'angelo, Stefania
13375ecd-1117-4b6e-99c0-32239f52eed6
Syddall, Holly Emma
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Ntani, Georgia
9b009e0a-5ab2-4c6e-a9fd-15a601e92be5
Harris, E. Clare
3e4bd946-3f09-45a1-8725-d35e80dd7971
Linaker, Catherine
6c6d1b90-ee40-4c96-8b2e-b06efbe030ae
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Stevens, Martin
6ed230b2-7eaa-478b-80f7-ea75234bb76f
Walker-Bone, Karen
ad7d1336-ed2c-4f39-ade5-da84eb412109
D'angelo, Stefania
13375ecd-1117-4b6e-99c0-32239f52eed6
Syddall, Holly Emma
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Ntani, Georgia
9b009e0a-5ab2-4c6e-a9fd-15a601e92be5
Harris, E. Clare
3e4bd946-3f09-45a1-8725-d35e80dd7971
Linaker, Catherine
6c6d1b90-ee40-4c96-8b2e-b06efbe030ae
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Stevens, Martin
6ed230b2-7eaa-478b-80f7-ea75234bb76f
Walker-Bone, Karen
ad7d1336-ed2c-4f39-ade5-da84eb412109

D'angelo, Stefania, Syddall, Holly Emma, Ntani, Georgia, Harris, E. Clare, Linaker, Catherine, Cooper, Cyrus, Stevens, Martin and Walker-Bone, Karen (2020) How does job dissatisfaction interact with self-rated health in determining the risk of health-related job loss? Prospective findings from the Health and Employment After Fifty (HEAF) study. Occupational & Environmental Medicine, 78 (1), 36-42. (doi:10.1136/oemed-2020-106600).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives
Health and job satisfaction are key independent determinants of ability to work to older ages. We investigated the interaction of these two important factors on health-related job loss (HRJL) over 2 years of follow-up comparing male and female older workers.

Methods
A population sample of adults aged 50–64 years, recruited from 24 English general practices in the Health and Employment After Fifty (HEAF) study, completed questionnaires at baseline with follow-ups at 12 and 24 months. Multiple-record Cox proportional hazards models were performed to explore the main effects of, and potential interactions between, job satisfaction and self-rated health (SRH) as predictors of time to first HRJL.

Results
Of the initial 8134 participants, 5143 were ever in work in the study period. Among men, 5.7% and 14.3% reported job dissatisfaction (those in good and poor SRH, respectively), while among women these percentages were 4.6 and 12.9. HRJL was reported by 106 men and 176 women. Men in good health dissatisfied with their job had a sixfold (HR=6.4; 95% CI 3.3 to 12.4) increased risk of HRJL compared with men satisfied with their job (significant multiplicative interaction). Women dissatisfied with their job were more likely to have an HRJL within 2 years of follow-up irrespective of their SRH.

Conclusions
SRH and job dissatisfaction have important individual effects on the risk of stopping work for health among older workers. These findings point to the importance of job satisfaction in reducing health-related exit from paid work among older workers.

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Paper on Job satisfaction SRH HRJL_Revisionsv2_clean - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 24 July 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 11 September 2020
Published date: 11 December 2020
Keywords: ageing, fitness for work, musculoskeletal, retired

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443119
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443119
ISSN: 1351-0711
PURE UUID: 78002dd8-4032-49f7-9e8c-f8ff7b9a7474
ORCID for Stefania D'angelo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7267-1837
ORCID for Holly Emma Syddall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0171-0306
ORCID for E. Clare Harris: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8037-566X
ORCID for Catherine Linaker: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1091-9283
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Martin Stevens: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6142-5278
ORCID for Karen Walker-Bone: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5992-1459

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Aug 2020 16:32
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 06:16

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Contributors

Author: Stefania D'angelo ORCID iD
Author: Georgia Ntani
Author: E. Clare Harris ORCID iD
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: Martin Stevens ORCID iD

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