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Death and dying in pre-hospital care: what are the experiences and issues for pre-hospital practitioners, families and bystanders? A scoping review

Death and dying in pre-hospital care: what are the experiences and issues for pre-hospital practitioners, families and bystanders? A scoping review
Death and dying in pre-hospital care: what are the experiences and issues for pre-hospital practitioners, families and bystanders? A scoping review
Objective: To identify the factors that shape and characterise experiences of pre-hospital practitioners (PHPs), families, and bystanders in the context of death and dying outside of the hospital environment where PHPs respond. Design: A scoping review using Arksey and O’Malley’s five-stage framework. Papers were analysed using thematic analysis Data sources: MEDLINE; Embase; CINAHL; Scopus; Social Sciences Citation Index (Web of Science), ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&I (Proquest), Health Technology Assessment (HTA) database; PsycINFO; Grey Literature Report and PapersFirst were searched from January 2000-May 2019. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies: Qualitative and mixed method studies reporting the experiences of PHPs, families and bystanders of death and dying in pre-hospital settings as a result of natural causes, trauma, suicide and homicide, >18 years of age, in Europe, USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Results: Searches identified 15,352 papers of which 51 met the inclusion criteria. The review found substantial evidence of PHP experiences, except call-handlers, and papers reporting family and bystander experiences were limited. PHP work was varied and complex, whilst confident in clinical work, they felt less equipped to deal with the emotion work, especially with an increasing role in palliative and end-of-life care. Families and bystanders reported generally positive experiences but their support needs were rarely explored. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge this is the first review that explores the experiences of PHPs, families and bystanders. An important outcome is identifying current gaps in knowledge where further empirical research is needed. The paucity of evidence suggested by this review on call-handlers, families and bystanders presents opportunities to investigate their experiences in greater depth. Further research to address the current knowledge gaps will be important to inform future policy and practice.
accident & emergency medicine, palliative care, qualitative research
2044-6055
e036925
Myall, Michelle
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Rowsell, Alison
058f3917-b556-4eef-a393-4c025a3c4ccb
Lund, Susi
239a4d54-13e1-4d69-8e3f-08475c20af47
Turnbull, Joanne
cd1f8462-d698-4a90-af82-46c39536694b
Arber, Mick
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Crouch, Robert
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Pocock, Helen
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Deakin, Charles D.
f308bd7c-4c95-4b55-8983-8237cde25967
Richardson, Alison
3db30680-aa47-43a5-b54d-62d10ece17b7
Myall, Michelle
0604ba0f-75c2-4783-9afe-aa54bf81513f
Rowsell, Alison
058f3917-b556-4eef-a393-4c025a3c4ccb
Lund, Susi
239a4d54-13e1-4d69-8e3f-08475c20af47
Turnbull, Joanne
cd1f8462-d698-4a90-af82-46c39536694b
Arber, Mick
17f54325-49f5-47e8-80f8-8fd28cb84ac6
Crouch, Robert
3a3b1f32-e067-43d0-9bc7-85d1229412fe
Pocock, Helen
2380e94b-4916-4498-beac-dba8d2971bf4
Deakin, Charles D.
f308bd7c-4c95-4b55-8983-8237cde25967
Richardson, Alison
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Myall, Michelle, Rowsell, Alison, Lund, Susi, Turnbull, Joanne, Arber, Mick, Crouch, Robert, Pocock, Helen, Deakin, Charles D. and Richardson, Alison (2020) Death and dying in pre-hospital care: what are the experiences and issues for pre-hospital practitioners, families and bystanders? A scoping review. BMJ Open, 10 (9), e036925, [e036925]. (doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2020-036925).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: To identify the factors that shape and characterise experiences of pre-hospital practitioners (PHPs), families, and bystanders in the context of death and dying outside of the hospital environment where PHPs respond. Design: A scoping review using Arksey and O’Malley’s five-stage framework. Papers were analysed using thematic analysis Data sources: MEDLINE; Embase; CINAHL; Scopus; Social Sciences Citation Index (Web of Science), ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&I (Proquest), Health Technology Assessment (HTA) database; PsycINFO; Grey Literature Report and PapersFirst were searched from January 2000-May 2019. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies: Qualitative and mixed method studies reporting the experiences of PHPs, families and bystanders of death and dying in pre-hospital settings as a result of natural causes, trauma, suicide and homicide, >18 years of age, in Europe, USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Results: Searches identified 15,352 papers of which 51 met the inclusion criteria. The review found substantial evidence of PHP experiences, except call-handlers, and papers reporting family and bystander experiences were limited. PHP work was varied and complex, whilst confident in clinical work, they felt less equipped to deal with the emotion work, especially with an increasing role in palliative and end-of-life care. Families and bystanders reported generally positive experiences but their support needs were rarely explored. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge this is the first review that explores the experiences of PHPs, families and bystanders. An important outcome is identifying current gaps in knowledge where further empirical research is needed. The paucity of evidence suggested by this review on call-handlers, families and bystanders presents opportunities to investigate their experiences in greater depth. Further research to address the current knowledge gaps will be important to inform future policy and practice.

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Death and dying in pre-hospital care what are the experiences and issues for pre-hospital practitioners, families and bystanders A scoping review - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 14 August 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 18 September 2020
Keywords: accident & emergency medicine, palliative care, qualitative research

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443353
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443353
ISSN: 2044-6055
PURE UUID: c776cef7-2416-476e-aefe-9a1140ecc3a8
ORCID for Michelle Myall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8733-7412
ORCID for Joanne Turnbull: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5006-4438
ORCID for Alison Richardson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3127-5755

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Aug 2020 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 06:35

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Contributors

Author: Michelle Myall ORCID iD
Author: Alison Rowsell
Author: Susi Lund
Author: Joanne Turnbull ORCID iD
Author: Mick Arber
Author: Robert Crouch
Author: Helen Pocock
Author: Charles D. Deakin

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