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On the potential of a functionally graded acoustic black hole using multi-material additive manufacturing

On the potential of a functionally graded acoustic black hole using multi-material additive manufacturing
On the potential of a functionally graded acoustic black hole using multi-material additive manufacturing
Acoustic Black Holes (ABHs) have been demonstrated as an effective and particularly lightweight passive vibration control solution. They are able to achieve a high level of structural damping with a thin layer of concentrated damping material by introducing a reduction in the structural wave speed. This is generally achieved by introducing a geometrical taper into the structure and the performance is maximised with a long taper that reaches a small tip height. This design approach introduces a potential weakness into the structure and, therefore, this paper explores an alternative method of achieving a reduction in the wave speed. Instead of a geometrical taper, the potential of realising the ABH effect using a functionally graded structural feature that can be achieved through multi-material additive manufacturing is investigated. Requirements on the gradient of the material properties are first investigated and then a design optimisation strategy is presented to enable the practical realisation within the constraints of a commercially available multi-material additive manufacturing process.
Cheer, Jordan
8e452f50-4c7d-4d4e-913a-34015e99b9dc
Daley, Stephen
53cef7f1-77fa-4a4c-9745-b6a0ba4f42e6
Cheer, Jordan
8e452f50-4c7d-4d4e-913a-34015e99b9dc
Daley, Stephen
53cef7f1-77fa-4a4c-9745-b6a0ba4f42e6

Cheer, Jordan and Daley, Stephen (2020) On the potential of a functionally graded acoustic black hole using multi-material additive manufacturing. Inter-Noise 2020, Online. 23 - 26 Aug 2020. 6 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Acoustic Black Holes (ABHs) have been demonstrated as an effective and particularly lightweight passive vibration control solution. They are able to achieve a high level of structural damping with a thin layer of concentrated damping material by introducing a reduction in the structural wave speed. This is generally achieved by introducing a geometrical taper into the structure and the performance is maximised with a long taper that reaches a small tip height. This design approach introduces a potential weakness into the structure and, therefore, this paper explores an alternative method of achieving a reduction in the wave speed. Instead of a geometrical taper, the potential of realising the ABH effect using a functionally graded structural feature that can be achieved through multi-material additive manufacturing is investigated. Requirements on the gradient of the material properties are first investigated and then a design optimisation strategy is presented to enable the practical realisation within the constraints of a commercially available multi-material additive manufacturing process.

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Published date: 23 August 2020
Venue - Dates: Inter-Noise 2020, Online, 2020-08-23 - 2020-08-26

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443480
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443480
PURE UUID: ab264f87-0712-4cac-86e9-9833b1959897
ORCID for Jordan Cheer: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0552-5506

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Date deposited: 26 Aug 2020 16:36
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 02:04

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