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A diary study of distracted driving behaviours

A diary study of distracted driving behaviours
A diary study of distracted driving behaviours
The introduction and uptake of technology within road vehicles has readily advanced their capabilities and the functions that drivers’ of the vehicle have available to them. While this has benefited the drivers’ productivity and entertainment behind the wheel, it has also heightened the possibility for distraction. Research into driver distraction to date has identified how technologies inside the vehicle may be used ineffectively and can compromise the safety of the road transport system. Yet, the factors that drivers state impact on their decision to engage with distracting technologies are less well known. This paper presents the first diary study into driver distraction. It asked drivers to record all technological distractions that they engaged with across a 4-week period, as well as interactions that they ignored or choose not to engage with. The diary entries include the technologies drivers interacted with and the conditions surrounding this, as well as external factors that drivers cited to influence their decision to interact. Primarily, factors relating to the task itself were found to be of most importance to the drivers’ decision to engage. Differences were also found in how drivers stated they compensated for any engagement with distracting tasks. This has important consequences for the design and integration of technological devices into the vehicle. The novel application of the method offers insights into the naturalistic conditions surrounding drivers’ involvement with distracting technologies. The method is reviewed on its applicability to the study of driver distraction.
Driver Distraction, In-vehicle technology, Qualitative, Road safety, diary study
1369-8478
1-14
Parnell, Katie
3f21709a-403b-40e1-844b-0c0a89063b7b
Rand, James
50e61227-9b97-4498-bbfe-ae957b49aadd
Plant, Katherine
3638555a-f2ca-4539-962c-422686518a78
Parnell, Katie
3f21709a-403b-40e1-844b-0c0a89063b7b
Rand, James
50e61227-9b97-4498-bbfe-ae957b49aadd
Plant, Katherine
3638555a-f2ca-4539-962c-422686518a78

Parnell, Katie, Rand, James and Plant, Katherine (2020) A diary study of distracted driving behaviours. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 74, 1-14.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The introduction and uptake of technology within road vehicles has readily advanced their capabilities and the functions that drivers’ of the vehicle have available to them. While this has benefited the drivers’ productivity and entertainment behind the wheel, it has also heightened the possibility for distraction. Research into driver distraction to date has identified how technologies inside the vehicle may be used ineffectively and can compromise the safety of the road transport system. Yet, the factors that drivers state impact on their decision to engage with distracting technologies are less well known. This paper presents the first diary study into driver distraction. It asked drivers to record all technological distractions that they engaged with across a 4-week period, as well as interactions that they ignored or choose not to engage with. The diary entries include the technologies drivers interacted with and the conditions surrounding this, as well as external factors that drivers cited to influence their decision to interact. Primarily, factors relating to the task itself were found to be of most importance to the drivers’ decision to engage. Differences were also found in how drivers stated they compensated for any engagement with distracting tasks. This has important consequences for the design and integration of technological devices into the vehicle. The novel application of the method offers insights into the naturalistic conditions surrounding drivers’ involvement with distracting technologies. The method is reviewed on its applicability to the study of driver distraction.

Text
V2 Manuscript Diary Study Driver Distraction - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 19 August 2022.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 3 August 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 August 2020
Published date: October 2020
Keywords: Driver Distraction, In-vehicle technology, Qualitative, Road safety, diary study

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443729
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443729
ISSN: 1369-8478
PURE UUID: fb10a352-cf14-4086-8e96-7ac880065434
ORCID for Katherine Plant: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4532-2818

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Sep 2020 16:36
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:55

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Contributors

Author: Katie Parnell
Author: James Rand
Author: Katherine Plant ORCID iD

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