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Turing in the driver’s seat: can people distinguish between automated and manually driven vehicles?

Turing in the driver’s seat: can people distinguish between automated and manually driven vehicles?
Turing in the driver’s seat: can people distinguish between automated and manually driven vehicles?
As the number of automated vehicles is increasing on our roads, we wanted to know if people could detect if a car was being driven by a human driver or automation in a lane change task. This is particularly relevant, as most of the road collisions involve automated vehicles being struck from behind by manually driven vehicles. To address the detection of automated vehicles, an online survey presented videos of lane change manoeuvres on multilane carriageways from behind the automated vehicle. We reasoned that, on such roads, the behaviour of the vehicles in front would have more of an affect on drivers than those of the vehicles behind. To this end, an online survey was conducted with 769 people judging 60 video clips, classifying the lane change either being performed by Autopilot software or a human driver. Over 34,000 responses were recorded. It was found that automated and manual lane changes were virtually indistinguishable from the rear of the vehicle. The main conclusion of the research was that vehicles in automated mode should display this fact to other road users all around the vehicle as this may have an affect on other road users in anticipating the behaviour of the other vehicle.
automation, autopilot, Turing test, self driving, road user interaction
0018-7208
1-8
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Eriksson, Alexander
e3b11748-5b8d-40b9-b79c-ca6a5968c6b3
Banks, Victoria
0dbdcad0-c654-4b87-a804-6a7548d0196d
Hancock, P.A.
74168dea-32d1-412d-beef-61d0b565833b
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Eriksson, Alexander
e3b11748-5b8d-40b9-b79c-ca6a5968c6b3
Banks, Victoria
0dbdcad0-c654-4b87-a804-6a7548d0196d
Hancock, P.A.
74168dea-32d1-412d-beef-61d0b565833b

Stanton, Neville, Eriksson, Alexander, Banks, Victoria and Hancock, P.A. (2020) Turing in the driver’s seat: can people distinguish between automated and manually driven vehicles? Human Factors: The Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, 1-8. (doi:10.1002/hfm.20864).

Record type: Article

Abstract

As the number of automated vehicles is increasing on our roads, we wanted to know if people could detect if a car was being driven by a human driver or automation in a lane change task. This is particularly relevant, as most of the road collisions involve automated vehicles being struck from behind by manually driven vehicles. To address the detection of automated vehicles, an online survey presented videos of lane change manoeuvres on multilane carriageways from behind the automated vehicle. We reasoned that, on such roads, the behaviour of the vehicles in front would have more of an affect on drivers than those of the vehicles behind. To this end, an online survey was conducted with 769 people judging 60 video clips, classifying the lane change either being performed by Autopilot software or a human driver. Over 34,000 responses were recorded. It was found that automated and manual lane changes were virtually indistinguishable from the rear of the vehicle. The main conclusion of the research was that vehicles in automated mode should display this fact to other road users all around the vehicle as this may have an affect on other road users in anticipating the behaviour of the other vehicle.

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TURING IN THE DRIVERS SEAT 2020 FINAL VERSION - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 4 August 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 August 2020
Published date: 3 September 2020
Keywords: automation, autopilot, Turing test, self driving, road user interaction

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443749
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443749
ISSN: 0018-7208
PURE UUID: cc59c141-b41c-471f-8dc5-430c2e3be593
ORCID for Neville Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Sep 2020 16:48
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:13

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Contributors

Author: Neville Stanton ORCID iD
Author: Alexander Eriksson
Author: Victoria Banks
Author: P.A. Hancock

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