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Adiposity and bone microarchitecture in the GLOW Study

Adiposity and bone microarchitecture in the GLOW Study
Adiposity and bone microarchitecture in the GLOW Study
Purpose: to examine bone microarchitecture in relation to fat mass and examine both areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and microarchitecture in relation to BMI categories in the UK arm of the Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women. Methods: 491 women completed questionnaires detailing medical history; underwent anthropometric assessment; high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) scans of the radius and tibia; and DXA scans of whole body, proximal femur and lumbar spine. Fat mass index (FMI) residuals (independent of lean mass index) were derived. Linear regression was used to examine HRpQCT and DXA aBMD parameters according to BMI category (unadjusted) and HRpQCT parameters in relation to FMI residuals (with and without adjustment for anthropometric, demographic and lifestyle covariates). Results: mean (SD) age was 70.9 (5.4) years; 35.0% were overweight, 14.5% class 1 obese, and 7.7% class 2/3 obese. There were significant increasing trends according to BMI category in aBMD of whole body, hip, femoral neck and lumbar spine (p≤0.001); cortical area (p<0.001), thickness (p<0.001), and volumetric density (p<0.03), and trabecular number (p<0.001), volumetric density (p<0.04) and separation (p<0.001 for decreasing trend) at the radius and tibia. When normalised for body weight, all HRpQCT and DXA aBMD parameters decreased as BMI increased (p<0.001). FMI residuals were associated with bone size and trabecular architecture at the radius and tibia, and tibial cortical microarchitecture. Conclusion: significant trends in HRpQCT parameters suggested favorable bone microarchitecture at the radius and tibia with increasing BMI but these were not proportionate to increased weight.
0937-941X
Litwic, Anna
420510aa-23c8-4134-8615-31a85021ae4b
Westbury, Leo
5ed45df3-3df7-4bf9-bbad-07b63cd4b281
Ward, Kathryn
39bd4db1-c948-4e32-930e-7bec8deb54c7
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Litwic, Anna
420510aa-23c8-4134-8615-31a85021ae4b
Westbury, Leo
5ed45df3-3df7-4bf9-bbad-07b63cd4b281
Ward, Kathryn
39bd4db1-c948-4e32-930e-7bec8deb54c7
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1

Litwic, Anna, Westbury, Leo, Ward, Kathryn, Cooper, Cyrus and Dennison, Elaine (2020) Adiposity and bone microarchitecture in the GLOW Study. Osteoporosis International. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose: to examine bone microarchitecture in relation to fat mass and examine both areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and microarchitecture in relation to BMI categories in the UK arm of the Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women. Methods: 491 women completed questionnaires detailing medical history; underwent anthropometric assessment; high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) scans of the radius and tibia; and DXA scans of whole body, proximal femur and lumbar spine. Fat mass index (FMI) residuals (independent of lean mass index) were derived. Linear regression was used to examine HRpQCT and DXA aBMD parameters according to BMI category (unadjusted) and HRpQCT parameters in relation to FMI residuals (with and without adjustment for anthropometric, demographic and lifestyle covariates). Results: mean (SD) age was 70.9 (5.4) years; 35.0% were overweight, 14.5% class 1 obese, and 7.7% class 2/3 obese. There were significant increasing trends according to BMI category in aBMD of whole body, hip, femoral neck and lumbar spine (p≤0.001); cortical area (p<0.001), thickness (p<0.001), and volumetric density (p<0.03), and trabecular number (p<0.001), volumetric density (p<0.04) and separation (p<0.001 for decreasing trend) at the radius and tibia. When normalised for body weight, all HRpQCT and DXA aBMD parameters decreased as BMI increased (p<0.001). FMI residuals were associated with bone size and trabecular architecture at the radius and tibia, and tibial cortical microarchitecture. Conclusion: significant trends in HRpQCT parameters suggested favorable bone microarchitecture at the radius and tibia with increasing BMI but these were not proportionate to increased weight.

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Adiposity and bone microarchitecture in the GLOW Study - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 13 August 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443941
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443941
ISSN: 0937-941X
PURE UUID: ca35705c-eeef-4cfb-9fa6-1cec3deb855e
ORCID for Kathryn Ward: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7034-6750
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Elaine Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961

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Date deposited: 17 Sep 2020 16:35
Last modified: 13 Aug 2021 04:01

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Contributors

Author: Anna Litwic
Author: Leo Westbury
Author: Kathryn Ward ORCID iD
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: Elaine Dennison ORCID iD

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