The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Do human milk oligosaccharides protect against infant atopic disorders and food allergy?

Do human milk oligosaccharides protect against infant atopic disorders and food allergy?
Do human milk oligosaccharides protect against infant atopic disorders and food allergy?
Atopic disorders (AD), often coexistent with food allergy (FA), start developing in early life and have lifelong health consequences. Breastfeeding is thought to be protective against AD and FA, but the data are controversial, and mechanisms are not well understood. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) are complex carbohydrates that are abundant in human milk. These are thought to contribute to the development of the infant immune system by (i) promoting healthy microbiome, (ii) inhibiting pathogen binding to gut mucosa and (iii) modulating the immune system. Differences in microbiome composition between allergic and healthy infants have been observed, regardless of breastfeeding history. To date, limited studies have examined the preventive effects of HMOs on AD and FA in infants and current data relies on observation studies as trials of varying HMO intake through randomising individuals to breastfeeding are unethical. There is evidence for beneficial effects of breastfeeding on lowering the risks of FA, eczema and asthma but there are inconsistencies amongst studies in the duration of breastfeeding, diagnostic criteria for AD and the age at which the outcome was assessed. Furthermore, current analytical methods primarily used today only allow detection of 16–20 major HMOs while more than 100 types have been identified. More large-scale longitudinal studies are required to investigate the role of HMO composition and the impact of changes over the lactation period in preventing AD and FA later in life
Atopic disorders, Breastfeeding, Food allergy, Human milk oligosaccharides
2072-6643
1-12
Han, Soo Min
a5553445-90bc-46c1-9a6c-c7a1e5465a44
Binia, Aristea
33b90ad5-7794-48f1-843e-11a1b922126f
Godfrey, Keith
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
El-Heis, Sarah
6d7d2e03-3d63-4510-8b7e-fcbe4653db13
Cutfield, Wayne
a01589bd-5b82-49fa-89e1-137e6f59e24d
Han, Soo Min
a5553445-90bc-46c1-9a6c-c7a1e5465a44
Binia, Aristea
33b90ad5-7794-48f1-843e-11a1b922126f
Godfrey, Keith
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
El-Heis, Sarah
6d7d2e03-3d63-4510-8b7e-fcbe4653db13
Cutfield, Wayne
a01589bd-5b82-49fa-89e1-137e6f59e24d

Han, Soo Min, Binia, Aristea, Godfrey, Keith, El-Heis, Sarah and Cutfield, Wayne (2020) Do human milk oligosaccharides protect against infant atopic disorders and food allergy? Nutrients, 12 (10), 1-12, [3212]. (doi:10.3390/nu12103212).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Atopic disorders (AD), often coexistent with food allergy (FA), start developing in early life and have lifelong health consequences. Breastfeeding is thought to be protective against AD and FA, but the data are controversial, and mechanisms are not well understood. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) are complex carbohydrates that are abundant in human milk. These are thought to contribute to the development of the infant immune system by (i) promoting healthy microbiome, (ii) inhibiting pathogen binding to gut mucosa and (iii) modulating the immune system. Differences in microbiome composition between allergic and healthy infants have been observed, regardless of breastfeeding history. To date, limited studies have examined the preventive effects of HMOs on AD and FA in infants and current data relies on observation studies as trials of varying HMO intake through randomising individuals to breastfeeding are unethical. There is evidence for beneficial effects of breastfeeding on lowering the risks of FA, eczema and asthma but there are inconsistencies amongst studies in the duration of breastfeeding, diagnostic criteria for AD and the age at which the outcome was assessed. Furthermore, current analytical methods primarily used today only allow detection of 16–20 major HMOs while more than 100 types have been identified. More large-scale longitudinal studies are required to investigate the role of HMO composition and the impact of changes over the lactation period in preventing AD and FA later in life

Text
nutrients_HMOsAllergy_published_2020.10.21 - Accepted Manuscript
Download (212kB)
Text
nutrients_HMOsAllergy_Figure 1caption
Download (118kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 October 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 October 2020
Keywords: Atopic disorders, Breastfeeding, Food allergy, Human milk oligosaccharides

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 444864
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444864
ISSN: 2072-6643
PURE UUID: dba6ec99-0928-40df-96a9-5e8e9f299bee
ORCID for Keith Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Nov 2020 17:34
Last modified: 27 Apr 2021 01:34

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Soo Min Han
Author: Aristea Binia
Author: Keith Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: Sarah El-Heis
Author: Wayne Cutfield

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×