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Lipidomic analysis of plasma from healthy men and women shows phospholipid class and molecular species differences between sexes

Lipidomic analysis of plasma from healthy men and women shows phospholipid class and molecular species differences between sexes
Lipidomic analysis of plasma from healthy men and women shows phospholipid class and molecular species differences between sexes
The phospholipid composition of lipoproteins is determined by the specificity of hepatic phospholipid biosynthesis. Plasma phospholipid 20:4n-6 and 22:6n-3 concentrations are higher in women than in men. We used this sex difference in a lipidomics analysis of the impact of endocrine factors on the phospholipid class and molecular species composition of fasting plasma from young men and women. Diester species predominated in all lipid classes measured. 20/54 PC species were alkyl ester, 15/48 PE species were alkyl ester, and 12/48 PE species were alkenyl ester. There were no significant differences between sexes in the proportions of alkyl PC species. The proportion of alkyl ester PE species was greater in women than men, while the proportion of alkenyl ester PE species was greater in men than women. None of the PI or PS molecular species contained ether linked fatty acids. The proportion of PC16:0_22:6, and the proportions of PE O-16:0_20:4 and PE O-18:2_20:4 were greater in women than men. There were no sex differences in PI and PS molecular species compositions. These findings show that plasma phospholipids can be modified by sex. Such differences in lipoprotein phospholipid composition could contribute to sexual dimorphism in patterns of health and disease.
Phospholipids, lipoprotein, molecular species, sex hormones
0024-4201
West, Annette
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Michaelson, Louise
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Miles, Elizabeth
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Haslam, Richard
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Lillycrop, Karen
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Georgescu, Ramona
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Han, Lihua
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Napier, Johnathan
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Calder, Philip
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Burdge, Graham
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West, Annette
c1923242-802f-4331-b743-31de45d3883c
Michaelson, Louise
c0b5d276-6ab0-43b2-a798-cbddce5e36a4
Miles, Elizabeth
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Haslam, Richard
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Lillycrop, Karen
eeaaa78d-0c4d-4033-a178-60ce7345a2cc
Georgescu, Ramona
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Han, Lihua
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Napier, Johnathan
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Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Burdge, Graham
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West, Annette, Michaelson, Louise, Miles, Elizabeth, Haslam, Richard, Lillycrop, Karen, Georgescu, Ramona, Han, Lihua, Napier, Johnathan, Calder, Philip and Burdge, Graham (2020) Lipidomic analysis of plasma from healthy men and women shows phospholipid class and molecular species differences between sexes. Lipids. (DOI10.1002/lipd.12293).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The phospholipid composition of lipoproteins is determined by the specificity of hepatic phospholipid biosynthesis. Plasma phospholipid 20:4n-6 and 22:6n-3 concentrations are higher in women than in men. We used this sex difference in a lipidomics analysis of the impact of endocrine factors on the phospholipid class and molecular species composition of fasting plasma from young men and women. Diester species predominated in all lipid classes measured. 20/54 PC species were alkyl ester, 15/48 PE species were alkyl ester, and 12/48 PE species were alkenyl ester. There were no significant differences between sexes in the proportions of alkyl PC species. The proportion of alkyl ester PE species was greater in women than men, while the proportion of alkenyl ester PE species was greater in men than women. None of the PI or PS molecular species contained ether linked fatty acids. The proportion of PC16:0_22:6, and the proportions of PE O-16:0_20:4 and PE O-18:2_20:4 were greater in women than men. There were no sex differences in PI and PS molecular species compositions. These findings show that plasma phospholipids can be modified by sex. Such differences in lipoprotein phospholipid composition could contribute to sexual dimorphism in patterns of health and disease.

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Accepted/In Press date: 29 October 2020
Published date: 7 December 2020
Keywords: Phospholipids, lipoprotein, molecular species, sex hormones

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Local EPrints ID: 444942
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444942
DOI: DOI10.1002/lipd.12293
ISSN: 0024-4201
PURE UUID: 410db3ee-09b0-448e-9c90-b45bf45fcc4e
ORCID for Annette West: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3331-0684
ORCID for Elizabeth Miles: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8643-0655
ORCID for Karen Lillycrop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7350-5489
ORCID for Philip Calder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6038-710X
ORCID for Graham Burdge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7665-2967

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Date deposited: 12 Nov 2020 17:33
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 03:18

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Contributors

Author: Annette West ORCID iD
Author: Louise Michaelson
Author: Elizabeth Miles ORCID iD
Author: Richard Haslam
Author: Karen Lillycrop ORCID iD
Author: Ramona Georgescu
Author: Lihua Han
Author: Johnathan Napier
Author: Philip Calder ORCID iD
Author: Graham Burdge ORCID iD

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