The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Coworking in homes – mitigating the tensions of the freelance economy

Coworking in homes – mitigating the tensions of the freelance economy
Coworking in homes – mitigating the tensions of the freelance economy
Coworking has increased in popularity in the digital knowledge economy with the rise of independent professional workers who often work from home and lack the social relations that provide feedback, referrals or social support. Rather than studying coworking as a new spatial, social and economic way of working in designated coworking spaces, this study explores coworking in residential homes – the earliest self-organised form of coworking that has received little attention although dedicated home-based coworking networks have developed since. Based on intensive fieldwork material from coworking groups of freelancers across Europe who meet in each other’s homes, we explore why people meet to cowork in homes – when at the same time coworking is driven by the social isolation of working alone in the ‘home office’ as emphasised in previous research on coworking spaces. Our findings highlight the need of freelance workers to learn how to be productive and maintain productivity. The shared experience of homeworking and awareness of the challenges of personalised professional work create cognitive proximity in home-based coworking. Coworkers commit to the production of an affective atmosphere which is facilitated by digital platforms, the role of hosts and the home environment. We discuss the implications of our findings for understanding coworking more generally.
coworking, entrepreneur, freelancer, homeworking, knowledge economy, productivity
0016-7185
122
Reuschke, Darja
224493ce-38bc-455d-9341-55f8555e7e13
Clifton, Nick
28c30dc8-7f5c-424d-b423-da73cebdb21f
Fisher, Michael Robert
ba6b9d91-819e-442a-8126-aba1eae43242
Reuschke, Darja
224493ce-38bc-455d-9341-55f8555e7e13
Clifton, Nick
28c30dc8-7f5c-424d-b423-da73cebdb21f
Fisher, Michael Robert
ba6b9d91-819e-442a-8126-aba1eae43242

Reuschke, Darja, Clifton, Nick and Fisher, Michael Robert (2021) Coworking in homes – mitigating the tensions of the freelance economy. Geoforum, 119, 122.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Coworking has increased in popularity in the digital knowledge economy with the rise of independent professional workers who often work from home and lack the social relations that provide feedback, referrals or social support. Rather than studying coworking as a new spatial, social and economic way of working in designated coworking spaces, this study explores coworking in residential homes – the earliest self-organised form of coworking that has received little attention although dedicated home-based coworking networks have developed since. Based on intensive fieldwork material from coworking groups of freelancers across Europe who meet in each other’s homes, we explore why people meet to cowork in homes – when at the same time coworking is driven by the social isolation of working alone in the ‘home office’ as emphasised in previous research on coworking spaces. Our findings highlight the need of freelance workers to learn how to be productive and maintain productivity. The shared experience of homeworking and awareness of the challenges of personalised professional work create cognitive proximity in home-based coworking. Coworkers commit to the production of an affective atmosphere which is facilitated by digital platforms, the role of hosts and the home environment. We discuss the implications of our findings for understanding coworking more generally.

Text
revised manuscript R2 clean - Accepted Manuscript
Download (1MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 5 January 2021
Published date: 19 January 2021
Keywords: coworking, entrepreneur, freelancer, homeworking, knowledge economy, productivity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 445994
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/445994
ISSN: 0016-7185
PURE UUID: a9f8515d-ae43-4d0b-89c0-736b89611a6a
ORCID for Darja Reuschke: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6961-1801

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Jan 2021 17:32
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 05:39

Export record

Contributors

Author: Darja Reuschke ORCID iD
Author: Nick Clifton
Author: Michael Robert Fisher

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×