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Cardiometabolic profile of different body composition phenotypes in children

Cardiometabolic profile of different body composition phenotypes in children
Cardiometabolic profile of different body composition phenotypes in children
Context
Cardiometabolic profiles of different body composition phenotypes are poorly characterized in young children, where it is well established that high adiposity is unfavorable, but the role of lean mass is unclear.

Objective
We hypothesized that higher lean mass attenuates cardiometabolic risk in children with high fat mass.

Methods
In 6-year-old children (n = 377) from the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) prospective birth cohort, whole-body composition was measured by quantitative magnetic resonance, a novel validated technology. Based on fat mass index (FMI) and lean mass index (LMI), 4 body composition phenotypes were derived: low FMI-low LMI (LF-LL), low FMI-high LMI (LF-HL), high FMI-low LMI (HF-LL), high FMI-high LMI (HF-HL).

Main Outcome Measures
Body mass index (BMI) z-score, fasting plasma glucose, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome risk score, fatty liver index, and blood pressure

Results
Compared with the LF-HL group, children in both high FMI groups had increased BMI z-score (HF-HL: 1.43 units 95% CI [1.11,1.76]; HF-LL: 0.61 units [0.25,0.96]) and metabolic syndrome risk score (HF-HL: 1.64 [0.77,2.50]; HF-LL: 1.28 [0.34,2.21]). The HF-HL group also had increased fatty liver index (1.15 [0.54,1.77]). Girls in HF-HL group had lower fasting plasma glucose (–0.29 mmol/L [–0.55,–0.04]) and diastolic blood pressure (–3.22 mmHg [–6.03,–0.41]) than girls in the HF-LL group. No similar associations were observed in boys.

Conclusion
In a multi-ethnic Asian cohort, lean mass seemed to protect against some cardiometabolic risk markers linked with adiposity, but only in girls. The FMI seemed more important than lean mass index in relation to cardiometabolic profiles of young children.
Body composition, adiposity, cardiometabolic, lean, metabolic syndrome
0021-972X
E2015-E2024
Ong, Yi Ying
a474cc8c-f956-4d25-a06b-c0b655347823
Huang, Jonathan Y.
35e14404-4a04-49f6-822a-65ec0ac4f50c
Michael, Navin
fb8b79bb-696c-480c-8a52-cf5f930c4f30
Sadananthan, Suresh Anand
41601e35-0034-44a4-b37f-87fc92adfe79
Yuan, Wen Lun
bd1a80dc-c82a-4387-b754-72e30dd603a7
Chen, Ling-Wei
528a58c5-d5ec-4dd8-b3c4-0f2f2a97ea53
Karnani, Neerja
f4d4879d-3be1-4d6d-8d37-48af1035a4cf
Velan, Sendhil
20621485-91f4-4cac-84f2-b39f51e80e45
Fortier, Marielle V.
8b9dc5de-429c-4f04-908c-5b4125fa019a
Tan, Kok Hian
672ae6c4-d4c8-4b1b-8512-efec36431503
Gluckman, Peter D.
e916630e-5ae2-437c-a1d1-8e24c0e05589
Yap, Fabian
22f6b954-31fc-4696-a52b-e985a424b95b
Chong, Yap-Seng
492de658-aa9e-4b57-95bf-33109f4d2cc5
Godfrey, Keith
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Chong, Mary Foong-Fong
1e188259-b1ab-4448-9e65-5b6a0fd99502
Chan, Shiao-Yng
3c9d8970-2cc4-430a-86a7-96f6029a5293
Lee, Yung Seng
0e28a8d6-3085-4086-9fa1-ac0684783bcf
Tint, Mya Thway
3aaf54db-4dbd-4d6b-90ae-440a18e381ef
Eriksson, Johan G.
eb96b1c5-af07-4a52-8a73-7541451d32cd
Ong, Yi Ying
a474cc8c-f956-4d25-a06b-c0b655347823
Huang, Jonathan Y.
35e14404-4a04-49f6-822a-65ec0ac4f50c
Michael, Navin
fb8b79bb-696c-480c-8a52-cf5f930c4f30
Sadananthan, Suresh Anand
41601e35-0034-44a4-b37f-87fc92adfe79
Yuan, Wen Lun
bd1a80dc-c82a-4387-b754-72e30dd603a7
Chen, Ling-Wei
528a58c5-d5ec-4dd8-b3c4-0f2f2a97ea53
Karnani, Neerja
f4d4879d-3be1-4d6d-8d37-48af1035a4cf
Velan, Sendhil
20621485-91f4-4cac-84f2-b39f51e80e45
Fortier, Marielle V.
8b9dc5de-429c-4f04-908c-5b4125fa019a
Tan, Kok Hian
672ae6c4-d4c8-4b1b-8512-efec36431503
Gluckman, Peter D.
e916630e-5ae2-437c-a1d1-8e24c0e05589
Yap, Fabian
22f6b954-31fc-4696-a52b-e985a424b95b
Chong, Yap-Seng
492de658-aa9e-4b57-95bf-33109f4d2cc5
Godfrey, Keith
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Chong, Mary Foong-Fong
1e188259-b1ab-4448-9e65-5b6a0fd99502
Chan, Shiao-Yng
3c9d8970-2cc4-430a-86a7-96f6029a5293
Lee, Yung Seng
0e28a8d6-3085-4086-9fa1-ac0684783bcf
Tint, Mya Thway
3aaf54db-4dbd-4d6b-90ae-440a18e381ef
Eriksson, Johan G.
eb96b1c5-af07-4a52-8a73-7541451d32cd

Ong, Yi Ying, Huang, Jonathan Y., Michael, Navin, Sadananthan, Suresh Anand, Yuan, Wen Lun, Chen, Ling-Wei, Karnani, Neerja, Velan, Sendhil, Fortier, Marielle V., Tan, Kok Hian, Gluckman, Peter D., Yap, Fabian, Chong, Yap-Seng, Godfrey, Keith, Chong, Mary Foong-Fong, Chan, Shiao-Yng, Lee, Yung Seng, Tint, Mya Thway and Eriksson, Johan G. (2021) Cardiometabolic profile of different body composition phenotypes in children. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 106 (5), E2015-E2024.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Context
Cardiometabolic profiles of different body composition phenotypes are poorly characterized in young children, where it is well established that high adiposity is unfavorable, but the role of lean mass is unclear.

Objective
We hypothesized that higher lean mass attenuates cardiometabolic risk in children with high fat mass.

Methods
In 6-year-old children (n = 377) from the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) prospective birth cohort, whole-body composition was measured by quantitative magnetic resonance, a novel validated technology. Based on fat mass index (FMI) and lean mass index (LMI), 4 body composition phenotypes were derived: low FMI-low LMI (LF-LL), low FMI-high LMI (LF-HL), high FMI-low LMI (HF-LL), high FMI-high LMI (HF-HL).

Main Outcome Measures
Body mass index (BMI) z-score, fasting plasma glucose, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome risk score, fatty liver index, and blood pressure

Results
Compared with the LF-HL group, children in both high FMI groups had increased BMI z-score (HF-HL: 1.43 units 95% CI [1.11,1.76]; HF-LL: 0.61 units [0.25,0.96]) and metabolic syndrome risk score (HF-HL: 1.64 [0.77,2.50]; HF-LL: 1.28 [0.34,2.21]). The HF-HL group also had increased fatty liver index (1.15 [0.54,1.77]). Girls in HF-HL group had lower fasting plasma glucose (–0.29 mmol/L [–0.55,–0.04]) and diastolic blood pressure (–3.22 mmHg [–6.03,–0.41]) than girls in the HF-LL group. No similar associations were observed in boys.

Conclusion
In a multi-ethnic Asian cohort, lean mass seemed to protect against some cardiometabolic risk markers linked with adiposity, but only in girls. The FMI seemed more important than lean mass index in relation to cardiometabolic profiles of young children.

Text
manuscript revision_v3_clean_20201209 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 4 January 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 1 February 2021
Keywords: Body composition, adiposity, cardiometabolic, lean, metabolic syndrome

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 446553
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/446553
ISSN: 0021-972X
PURE UUID: 1c19c630-e8ba-4d0b-8ff7-0509b4487e41
ORCID for Keith Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Feb 2021 17:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 02:36

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Contributors

Author: Yi Ying Ong
Author: Jonathan Y. Huang
Author: Navin Michael
Author: Suresh Anand Sadananthan
Author: Wen Lun Yuan
Author: Ling-Wei Chen
Author: Neerja Karnani
Author: Sendhil Velan
Author: Marielle V. Fortier
Author: Kok Hian Tan
Author: Peter D. Gluckman
Author: Fabian Yap
Author: Yap-Seng Chong
Author: Keith Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: Mary Foong-Fong Chong
Author: Shiao-Yng Chan
Author: Yung Seng Lee
Author: Mya Thway Tint
Author: Johan G. Eriksson

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