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Complete electrolytic plastron recovery in a low drag superhydrophobic surface

Complete electrolytic plastron recovery in a low drag superhydrophobic surface
Complete electrolytic plastron recovery in a low drag superhydrophobic surface
We present a superhydrophobic surface capable of recovering the lubricious gas layer known as the ‘plastron’ from a fully wetted state underwater. It is shown that full plastron recovery is possible without a second layer of structural hierarchy which is prone to irreversible wetting transitions. This allows us to use a cheap, fast and potentially scalable method to fabricate the surface from silicone and carbon black in a moulding process. We demonstrate plastron recovery from the fully wetted state and immediate plastron recovery after pressure induced wetting transitions. The wetting state can be measured remotely and quickly by measuring the capacitance. The slip length is measured as ~135 µm, agreeing well with the theory given the geometry of the surface. The ability of the surface to conform to small radii of curvature and withstand damage from loading is also demonstrated. The work presented here could allow superhydrophobic surfaces to reduce drag on ships and in pipes where the plastron would otherwise rapidly dissolve.
Superhydrophobic, dewetting, low drag, plastron recovery.
2470-1343
3483–3489
Lloyd, Ben Peter
97861a48-7b44-4bee-9962-e19e01ff3404
Bartlett, Philip N.
d99446db-a59d-4f89-96eb-f64b5d8bb075
Wood, Robert
d9523d31-41a8-459a-8831-70e29ffe8a73
Lloyd, Ben Peter
97861a48-7b44-4bee-9962-e19e01ff3404
Bartlett, Philip N.
d99446db-a59d-4f89-96eb-f64b5d8bb075
Wood, Robert
d9523d31-41a8-459a-8831-70e29ffe8a73

Lloyd, Ben Peter, Bartlett, Philip N. and Wood, Robert (2021) Complete electrolytic plastron recovery in a low drag superhydrophobic surface. ACS Omega, 6 (5), 3483–3489. (doi:10.1021/acsomega.0c03466).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We present a superhydrophobic surface capable of recovering the lubricious gas layer known as the ‘plastron’ from a fully wetted state underwater. It is shown that full plastron recovery is possible without a second layer of structural hierarchy which is prone to irreversible wetting transitions. This allows us to use a cheap, fast and potentially scalable method to fabricate the surface from silicone and carbon black in a moulding process. We demonstrate plastron recovery from the fully wetted state and immediate plastron recovery after pressure induced wetting transitions. The wetting state can be measured remotely and quickly by measuring the capacitance. The slip length is measured as ~135 µm, agreeing well with the theory given the geometry of the surface. The ability of the surface to conform to small radii of curvature and withstand damage from loading is also demonstrated. The work presented here could allow superhydrophobic surfaces to reduce drag on ships and in pipes where the plastron would otherwise rapidly dissolve.

Text
Revised Manuscript - Complete Electrolytic Plastron Recovery in a Low Drag Superhydrophobic Surface - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Published date: 18 January 2021
Keywords: Superhydrophobic, dewetting, low drag, plastron recovery.

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 446712
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/446712
ISSN: 2470-1343
PURE UUID: 780b5ab1-abea-4085-8520-a760c8f59c75
ORCID for Philip N. Bartlett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7300-6900
ORCID for Robert Wood: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0681-9239

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Feb 2021 17:33
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:37

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Contributors

Author: Ben Peter Lloyd
Author: Robert Wood ORCID iD

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