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Recent progress in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance of half-integer spin low-γ quadrupolar nuclei applied to inorganic materials

Recent progress in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance of half-integer spin low-γ quadrupolar nuclei applied to inorganic materials
Recent progress in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance of half-integer spin low-γ quadrupolar nuclei applied to inorganic materials

An overview is presented of recent progress in the solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) observation of low-γ nuclei, with a focus on applications to inorganic materials. The technological and methodological advances in the last 20 years, which have underpinned the increased accessibility of low-γ nuclei for study by solid-state NMR techniques, are summarised, including improvements in hardware, pulse sequences and associated computational methods (e.g., first principles calculations and spectral simulation). Some of the key initial observations from inorganic materials of these nuclei are highlighted along with some recent (most within the last 10 years) illustrations of their application to such materials. A summary of other recent reviews of the study of low-γ nuclei by solid-state NMR is provided so that a comprehensive understanding of what has been achieved to date is available.

half-integer, inorganic materials, low-γ nuclei, quadrupolar, solid-state NMR, structural characterisation
0749-1581
Smith, Mark E.
abd04fbf-5f56-459d-89ec-e51ab2598c09
Smith, Mark E.
abd04fbf-5f56-459d-89ec-e51ab2598c09

Smith, Mark E. (2021) Recent progress in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance of half-integer spin low-γ quadrupolar nuclei applied to inorganic materials. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry. (doi:10.1002/mrc.5116).

Record type: Review

Abstract

An overview is presented of recent progress in the solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) observation of low-γ nuclei, with a focus on applications to inorganic materials. The technological and methodological advances in the last 20 years, which have underpinned the increased accessibility of low-γ nuclei for study by solid-state NMR techniques, are summarised, including improvements in hardware, pulse sequences and associated computational methods (e.g., first principles calculations and spectral simulation). Some of the key initial observations from inorganic materials of these nuclei are highlighted along with some recent (most within the last 10 years) illustrations of their application to such materials. A summary of other recent reviews of the study of low-γ nuclei by solid-state NMR is provided so that a comprehensive understanding of what has been achieved to date is available.

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MRC_Review_Revised - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 13 November 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 18 November 2021
Keywords: half-integer, inorganic materials, low-γ nuclei, quadrupolar, solid-state NMR, structural characterisation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 447891
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/447891
ISSN: 0749-1581
PURE UUID: dca25b73-d8ef-40ba-83a6-c9fd52409289

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Date deposited: 25 Mar 2021 18:28
Last modified: 21 Oct 2021 17:18

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Author: Mark E. Smith

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