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Associations of cognitive performance with cardiovascular magnetic resonance phenotypes in the UK Biobank

Associations of cognitive performance with cardiovascular magnetic resonance phenotypes in the UK Biobank
Associations of cognitive performance with cardiovascular magnetic resonance phenotypes in the UK Biobank
Background: existing evidence suggests links between brain and cardiovascular health. We investigated associations between cognitive performance and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) phenotypes in the UK Biobank, considering a range of potential confounders.

Methods: we studied 29,763 participants with CMR and cognitive testing, specifically, fluid intelligence (FI, 13 verbal-numeric reasoning questions) and reaction time (RT, a timed pairs matching exercise); both were considered continuous variables for modelling. We included the following CMR metrics: left and right ventricular (LV, RV) volumes in end-diastole and end-systole, LV/RV ejection fractions, LV/RV stroke volumes, LV mass, and aortic distensibility. Multivariable linear regression models were used to estimate association of each CMR measure with FI and RT, adjusting for age, sex, smoking, education, deprivation, diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, prior myocardial infarction, alcohol intake, and exercise level. We report standardised beta-coefficients, 95% confidence intervals, and p-values adjusted for multiple testing.

Results: in this predominantly healthy cohort (average age 63.0± 7.5 years), better cognitive performance (higher FI, lower RT) was associated with larger LV/RV volumes, higher LV/RV stroke volumes, greater LV mass, and greater aortic distensibility in fully adjusted models. There was some evidence of non-linearity in the relationship between FI and LV end-systolic volume, with reversal of the direction of association at very high volumes. Associations were consistent for men and women and in different ages.

Conclusions: better cognitive performance is associated with CMR measures likely representing a healthier cardiovascular phenotype. These relationships remained significant after adjustment for a range of cardiometabolic, lifestyle, and demographic factors, suggesting possible involvement of alternative disease mechanisms.
0195-668X
Raisi-Estabragh, Zahra
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M'Charrak, Amine
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McCracken, Celeste
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Biasiolli, Luca
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Ardissino, Maddalena
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Curtis, Elizabeth
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Aung, Nay
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Suemoto, Claudia K.
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Mackay, Clare
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Suri, Sana
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Nichols, Thomas E.
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Harvey, Nicholas
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Petersen, Steffen E.
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Neubauer, Stefan
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Raisi-Estabragh, Zahra
43c85c5e-4574-476b-80d6-8fb1cdb3df0a
M'Charrak, Amine
bec8049b-95a2-4f0b-ac6d-0c8de3e02a10
McCracken, Celeste
5d772e9e-3aaa-41da-a5ef-3943b1631fd9
Biasiolli, Luca
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Ardissino, Maddalena
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Curtis, Elizabeth
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Aung, Nay
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Suemoto, Claudia K.
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Mackay, Clare
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Suri, Sana
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Nichols, Thomas E.
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Harvey, Nicholas
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Petersen, Steffen E.
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Neubauer, Stefan
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Raisi-Estabragh, Zahra, M'Charrak, Amine, McCracken, Celeste, Biasiolli, Luca, Ardissino, Maddalena, Curtis, Elizabeth, Aung, Nay, Suemoto, Claudia K., Mackay, Clare, Suri, Sana, Nichols, Thomas E., Harvey, Nicholas, Petersen, Steffen E. and Neubauer, Stefan (2021) Associations of cognitive performance with cardiovascular magnetic resonance phenotypes in the UK Biobank. European Heart Journal. (doi:10.1093/ehjci/jeab075).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: existing evidence suggests links between brain and cardiovascular health. We investigated associations between cognitive performance and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) phenotypes in the UK Biobank, considering a range of potential confounders.

Methods: we studied 29,763 participants with CMR and cognitive testing, specifically, fluid intelligence (FI, 13 verbal-numeric reasoning questions) and reaction time (RT, a timed pairs matching exercise); both were considered continuous variables for modelling. We included the following CMR metrics: left and right ventricular (LV, RV) volumes in end-diastole and end-systole, LV/RV ejection fractions, LV/RV stroke volumes, LV mass, and aortic distensibility. Multivariable linear regression models were used to estimate association of each CMR measure with FI and RT, adjusting for age, sex, smoking, education, deprivation, diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, prior myocardial infarction, alcohol intake, and exercise level. We report standardised beta-coefficients, 95% confidence intervals, and p-values adjusted for multiple testing.

Results: in this predominantly healthy cohort (average age 63.0± 7.5 years), better cognitive performance (higher FI, lower RT) was associated with larger LV/RV volumes, higher LV/RV stroke volumes, greater LV mass, and greater aortic distensibility in fully adjusted models. There was some evidence of non-linearity in the relationship between FI and LV end-systolic volume, with reversal of the direction of association at very high volumes. Associations were consistent for men and women and in different ages.

Conclusions: better cognitive performance is associated with CMR measures likely representing a healthier cardiovascular phenotype. These relationships remained significant after adjustment for a range of cardiometabolic, lifestyle, and demographic factors, suggesting possible involvement of alternative disease mechanisms.

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Accepted/In Press date: 4 April 2021
Published date: 14 May 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448196
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448196
ISSN: 0195-668X
PURE UUID: 84318229-4470-452e-a654-664cf71fc9a0
ORCID for Elizabeth Curtis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5147-0550
ORCID for Nicholas Harvey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8194-2512

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Date deposited: 14 Apr 2021 16:41
Last modified: 24 Nov 2021 02:49

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Contributors

Author: Zahra Raisi-Estabragh
Author: Amine M'Charrak
Author: Celeste McCracken
Author: Luca Biasiolli
Author: Maddalena Ardissino
Author: Nay Aung
Author: Claudia K. Suemoto
Author: Clare Mackay
Author: Sana Suri
Author: Thomas E. Nichols
Author: Nicholas Harvey ORCID iD
Author: Steffen E. Petersen
Author: Stefan Neubauer

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