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From oil spills to invasive species: Lagrangian modelling of connectivity in the Arctic Ocean

From oil spills to invasive species: Lagrangian modelling of connectivity in the Arctic Ocean
From oil spills to invasive species: Lagrangian modelling of connectivity in the Arctic Ocean
Marine connectivity describes the spatial and temporal linkages between separated parts of the global ocean. How different regions are connected, on what timescales, and by which oceanic pathways are important questions for a wide variety of applications. Answering these questions is an inherently interdisciplinary problem, with techniques including in-situ observations, remote sensing, and modelling used in synergy to answer key scientific questions. Here, a modelling approach is employed to contribute to our understanding of the wider field. This thesis focuses on understanding the importance of marine connectivity in the Arctic Ocean. The Arctic is a particularly important part of the global ocean, not least because of the impacts of climate change and loss of sea ice. This presents both challenges and opportunities - for instance, the retreat of Arctic sea ice is increasing interest in exploiting the region for resource extraction and commercial shipping, and changing circulation associated with a warming Arctic may permit invasive species to traverse the ocean. These and other drivers motivate research into how connectivity is shaping the ecological, physical, and socioeconomic features of the Arctic Ocean. Primarily using a Lagrangian particle-tracking technique in conjunction with a state of the art, eddy-permitting ocean model, three case studies – one biological, one physical and one socioeconomic – are used to explore the impact of marine connectivity in the Arctic Ocean. These studies respectively focus on: 1. Exploring the change in connectivity between the Beaufort Gyre and the sources of its freshwater contribution (Kelly et al., 2019); and 2. Investigating the spread of pollutants in the event of a shipping accident from the Northern Sea Route (Kelly et al.,iv2018); 3. Assessing the role of changing advective pathways linking the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on potential invasive species to the North Atlantic (Kelly et al., 2020). Individually, each paper addresses one specific aspect of Arctic connectivity. As chapters of a the-sis, they are designed to illustrate the importance of marine connectivity in linking physical, biological and socioeconomic factors in a rapidly changing Arctic Ocean.
University of Southampton
Kelly, Stephen John
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Kelly, Stephen John
5e453908-a436-4e72-87c0-8ddf1a18e53b
Popova, Ekaterina
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Aksenov, Yevgeny
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Yool, Andrew
882aeb0d-dda0-405e-844c-65b68cce5017
Marsh, Robert
702c2e7e-ac19-4019-abd9-a8614ab27717

Kelly, Stephen John (2021) From oil spills to invasive species: Lagrangian modelling of connectivity in the Arctic Ocean. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 161pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Marine connectivity describes the spatial and temporal linkages between separated parts of the global ocean. How different regions are connected, on what timescales, and by which oceanic pathways are important questions for a wide variety of applications. Answering these questions is an inherently interdisciplinary problem, with techniques including in-situ observations, remote sensing, and modelling used in synergy to answer key scientific questions. Here, a modelling approach is employed to contribute to our understanding of the wider field. This thesis focuses on understanding the importance of marine connectivity in the Arctic Ocean. The Arctic is a particularly important part of the global ocean, not least because of the impacts of climate change and loss of sea ice. This presents both challenges and opportunities - for instance, the retreat of Arctic sea ice is increasing interest in exploiting the region for resource extraction and commercial shipping, and changing circulation associated with a warming Arctic may permit invasive species to traverse the ocean. These and other drivers motivate research into how connectivity is shaping the ecological, physical, and socioeconomic features of the Arctic Ocean. Primarily using a Lagrangian particle-tracking technique in conjunction with a state of the art, eddy-permitting ocean model, three case studies – one biological, one physical and one socioeconomic – are used to explore the impact of marine connectivity in the Arctic Ocean. These studies respectively focus on: 1. Exploring the change in connectivity between the Beaufort Gyre and the sources of its freshwater contribution (Kelly et al., 2019); and 2. Investigating the spread of pollutants in the event of a shipping accident from the Northern Sea Route (Kelly et al.,iv2018); 3. Assessing the role of changing advective pathways linking the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on potential invasive species to the North Atlantic (Kelly et al., 2020). Individually, each paper addresses one specific aspect of Arctic connectivity. As chapters of a the-sis, they are designed to illustrate the importance of marine connectivity in linking physical, biological and socioeconomic factors in a rapidly changing Arctic Ocean.

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Published date: 19 April 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448610
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448610
PURE UUID: 82367d16-9832-4699-a26b-6d875c20b4e9

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Apr 2021 16:31
Last modified: 28 Apr 2021 16:31

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Contributors

Author: Stephen John Kelly
Thesis advisor: Ekaterina Popova
Thesis advisor: Yevgeny Aksenov
Thesis advisor: Andrew Yool
Thesis advisor: Robert Marsh

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