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Placental polar lipid composition is associated with placental gene expression and neonatal body composition

Placental polar lipid composition is associated with placental gene expression and neonatal body composition
Placental polar lipid composition is associated with placental gene expression and neonatal body composition
The polar-lipid composition of the placenta reflects its cellular heterogeneity and metabolism. This study explored relationships between placental polar-lipid composition, gene expression and neonatal body composition.

Placental tissue and maternal and offspring data were collected in the Southampton Women's Survey. Lipid and RNA were extracted from placental tissue and polar lipids measured by mass spectrometry, while gene expression was assessed using the nCounter analysis platform. Principal component analysis was used to identify patterns within placental lipid composition and these were correlated with neonatal body composition and placental gene expression.

In the analysis of placental lipids, the first three principal components explained 19.1%, 12.7% and 8.0% of variation in placental lipid composition, respectively. Principal component 2 was characterised by high principal component scores for acyl-alkyl-glycerophosphatidylcholines and lipid species containing DHA. Principal component 2 was associated with placental weight and neonatal lean mass; this component was associated with gene expression of APOE, PLIN2, FATP2, FABP4, LEP, G0S2, PNPLA2 and SRB1. Principal components 1 and 3 were not related to birth outcomes but they were associated with the gene expression of lipid related genes. Principal component 1 was associated with expression of LEP, APOE, FATP2 and ACAT2. Principal component 3 was associated with expression of PLIN2, PLIN3 and PNPLA2.

This study demonstrates that placentas of different sizes have specific differences in polar-lipid composition and related gene expression. These differences in lipid composition were associated with birth weight and neonatal lean mass, suggesting that placental lipid composition may influence prenatal lean mass accretion.
Gene expression, Lipidomics, Phospholipids, Placenta, Pregnancy
1388-1981
Uhl, Olaf
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Lewis, Rohan
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Hirschmugl, Birgit
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Crozier, Sarah
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Inskip, Hazel
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Gázquez, Antonio
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Harvey, Nicholas
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Cooper, Cyrus
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Desoye, Gernot
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Koletzko, Berthold
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Wadsack, Christian
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Demmelmair, Hans
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Godfrey, Keith
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Uhl, Olaf
ce12dd38-6d39-4466-970f-41bf1c40907f
Lewis, Rohan
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Hirschmugl, Birgit
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Crozier, Sarah
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Inskip, Hazel
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Gázquez, Antonio
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Harvey, Nicholas
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Cooper, Cyrus
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Desoye, Gernot
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Koletzko, Berthold
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Wadsack, Christian
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Demmelmair, Hans
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Godfrey, Keith
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Uhl, Olaf, Lewis, Rohan, Hirschmugl, Birgit, Crozier, Sarah, Inskip, Hazel, Gázquez, Antonio, Harvey, Nicholas, Cooper, Cyrus, Desoye, Gernot, Koletzko, Berthold, Wadsack, Christian, Demmelmair, Hans and Godfrey, Keith (2021) Placental polar lipid composition is associated with placental gene expression and neonatal body composition. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, 1866 (9), [158971]. (doi:10.1016/j.bbalip.2021.158971).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The polar-lipid composition of the placenta reflects its cellular heterogeneity and metabolism. This study explored relationships between placental polar-lipid composition, gene expression and neonatal body composition.

Placental tissue and maternal and offspring data were collected in the Southampton Women's Survey. Lipid and RNA were extracted from placental tissue and polar lipids measured by mass spectrometry, while gene expression was assessed using the nCounter analysis platform. Principal component analysis was used to identify patterns within placental lipid composition and these were correlated with neonatal body composition and placental gene expression.

In the analysis of placental lipids, the first three principal components explained 19.1%, 12.7% and 8.0% of variation in placental lipid composition, respectively. Principal component 2 was characterised by high principal component scores for acyl-alkyl-glycerophosphatidylcholines and lipid species containing DHA. Principal component 2 was associated with placental weight and neonatal lean mass; this component was associated with gene expression of APOE, PLIN2, FATP2, FABP4, LEP, G0S2, PNPLA2 and SRB1. Principal components 1 and 3 were not related to birth outcomes but they were associated with the gene expression of lipid related genes. Principal component 1 was associated with expression of LEP, APOE, FATP2 and ACAT2. Principal component 3 was associated with expression of PLIN2, PLIN3 and PNPLA2.

This study demonstrates that placentas of different sizes have specific differences in polar-lipid composition and related gene expression. These differences in lipid composition were associated with birth weight and neonatal lean mass, suggesting that placental lipid composition may influence prenatal lean mass accretion.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 May 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 May 2021
Published date: September 2021
Additional Information: Funding Information: This work has been financially supported in part by the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013), project EarlyNutrition (grant agreement n?289346) and the European Research Council Advanced Grant META-GROWTH (ERC-2012-AdG 322605). BK and KMG are supported by the European Union Erasmus+ Capacity-Building ENeASEA Project. BK is the Else Kr?ner-Seniorprofessor of Paediatrics at LMU supported by the Else Kroner-Fresenius Foundation and LMU Munich. KMG is supported by the UK Medical Research Council (MC_UU_12011/4), the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR Senior Investigator (NF-SI-0515-10042) and the NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre) and European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013, projects EarlyNutrition and ODIN under grant agreements 289346 and 613977). BH was supported by anniversary fund of the Austrian National Bank (OeNB 18181). HMI is supported by the UK Medical Research Council (MC_UU_12011/4). Funding Information: This work has been financially supported in part by the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013), project EarlyNutrition (grant agreement n° 289346 ) and the European Research Council Advanced Grant META-GROWTH ( ERC-2012-AdG 322605 ). BK and KMG are supported by the European Union Erasmus+ Capacity-Building ENeA SEA Project. BK is the Else Kröner-Seniorprofessor of Paediatrics at LMU supported by the Else Kroner-Fresenius Foundation and LMU Munich . KMG is supported by the UK Medical Research Council ( MC_UU_12011/4 ), the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR Senior Investigator ( NF-SI-0515-10042 ) and the NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre) and European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013, projects EarlyNutrition and ODIN under grant agreements 289346 and 613977 ). BH was supported by anniversary fund of the Austrian National Bank ( OeNB 18181 ). HMI is supported by the UK Medical Research Council ( MC_UU_12011/4 ). Publisher Copyright: © 2021 Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.
Keywords: Gene expression, Lipidomics, Phospholipids, Placenta, Pregnancy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 449432
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/449432
ISSN: 1388-1981
PURE UUID: 0d620d61-b6c6-4e6f-b92c-fa1e06f754c0
ORCID for Rohan Lewis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4044-9104
ORCID for Sarah Crozier: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9524-1127
ORCID for Hazel Inskip: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8897-1749
ORCID for Nicholas Harvey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8194-2512
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Keith Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 May 2021 16:31
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:48

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Contributors

Author: Olaf Uhl
Author: Rohan Lewis ORCID iD
Author: Birgit Hirschmugl
Author: Sarah Crozier ORCID iD
Author: Hazel Inskip ORCID iD
Author: Antonio Gázquez
Author: Nicholas Harvey ORCID iD
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: Gernot Desoye
Author: Berthold Koletzko
Author: Christian Wadsack
Author: Hans Demmelmair
Author: Keith Godfrey ORCID iD

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