The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The influence of facial dominance on perceptions of risk-taking preferences: Dominance and perceived risk taking

The influence of facial dominance on perceptions of risk-taking preferences: Dominance and perceived risk taking
The influence of facial dominance on perceptions of risk-taking preferences: Dominance and perceived risk taking
Higher perceived dominance leads to greater perceived risk-taking willingness. This, both for people differing in facial dominance (Study 1) and people whose dominance was digitally manipulated (Study 2). Yet, the effect of facial dominance varied to some degree across domains. Gender differences also emerged and these fitted stereotypes. Women were judged as less likely to take financial or recreational risks but more likely (Study 1) or as likely as men (Study 2) to take social risks. The assumption that perceived optimism and/or perceived competence mediate the effect of facial dominance on perceived risk-preferences was not supported. Overall, this research exemplifies the importance of considering the way cues such as dominance may have a differential effect in specific contexts. Our findings also challange the idea that assessment of risk-taking tendencies based on facial dominance serves the goal of determining male quality.
facial dominance, social perception, risk-preferences, risk domains
0197-3533
Hareli, Shlomo
5d377248-f00e-42e5-8349-7294d619a045
Hanoch, Yaniv
3cf08e80-8bda-4d3b-af1c-46c858aa9f39
Vider, Erez
8902e458-0d17-4930-bdf3-46403b55b485
Hareli, Shlomo
5d377248-f00e-42e5-8349-7294d619a045
Hanoch, Yaniv
3cf08e80-8bda-4d3b-af1c-46c858aa9f39
Vider, Erez
8902e458-0d17-4930-bdf3-46403b55b485

Hareli, Shlomo, Hanoch, Yaniv and Vider, Erez (2021) The influence of facial dominance on perceptions of risk-taking preferences: Dominance and perceived risk taking. Basic and Applied Social Psychology. (doi:10.1080/01973533.2021.1929988).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Higher perceived dominance leads to greater perceived risk-taking willingness. This, both for people differing in facial dominance (Study 1) and people whose dominance was digitally manipulated (Study 2). Yet, the effect of facial dominance varied to some degree across domains. Gender differences also emerged and these fitted stereotypes. Women were judged as less likely to take financial or recreational risks but more likely (Study 1) or as likely as men (Study 2) to take social risks. The assumption that perceived optimism and/or perceived competence mediate the effect of facial dominance on perceived risk-preferences was not supported. Overall, this research exemplifies the importance of considering the way cues such as dominance may have a differential effect in specific contexts. Our findings also challange the idea that assessment of risk-taking tendencies based on facial dominance serves the goal of determining male quality.

Text
Dominance_and_risk_judmgnet_Revision_with_names_II - Accepted Manuscript
Download (118kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 10 May 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 June 2021
Keywords: facial dominance, social perception, risk-preferences, risk domains

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 449493
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/449493
ISSN: 0197-3533
PURE UUID: bc1ac1ae-f30b-4d67-8df5-587ac4fb252b
ORCID for Yaniv Hanoch: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9453-4588

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Jun 2021 16:31
Last modified: 13 Dec 2021 06:35

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Shlomo Hareli
Author: Yaniv Hanoch ORCID iD
Author: Erez Vider

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×