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Psychological distress after subarachnoid haemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Psychological distress after subarachnoid haemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Psychological distress after subarachnoid haemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Objective: psychological distress is a common complication in patients after Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) which often has significant impact on the prognosis. The objective of this study was to determine the pooled prevalence of anxiety symptoms and depressive symptoms in patients after SAH and identify relevant risk factors. Methods: the study adopted a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol. Multiple databases including EMBASE, Medline, PsychInfo, and Web of Science were searched for publications before 1st January 2020. Screening, data extraction, and quality assessment were undertaken following the PRISMA guidelines for preferred reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analysis. The random-effects model was used to calculate pooled prevalence rates. Meta-analysis was conducted using Comprehensive Meta-analysis software. The review protocol was registered on PROSPERO (CRD42020182594). Results: 42 studies reporting anxiety symptoms and 64 studies reporting depressive symptoms were included. The pooled short term(<3 years) and long term(≥3 years) prevalence rates of anxiety symptoms were 31.4%(95% CI: 23.6%, 40.4%) and 40.4%(95% CI: 31.6%, 49.8%), respectively, whereas the pooled short term and long term prevalence rates of depressive symptoms were 25.2%(95%CI: 17.8%, 34.5%) and 35.8%(95%CI: 28.6%, 43.6%), respectively. Gender and pre-existing psychiatric conditions were identified as potential risk factors. Conclusions: the high prevalence of anxiety symptoms and depressive symptoms after SAH highlights the need for appropriate assessment and management of psychological stress in patients after SAH. Further research is warranted to explore potential underlying mechanisms and to develop holistic interventions that incorporate understanding of both the biological and psychological impact of SAH.
Anxiety, Depression, Meta-analysis, Subarachnoid haemorrhage, Systematic review
0022-3999
Bartlett, Maeve
013f7f0e-b7c2-4435-849d-f7b452680b10
Bulters, Diederik
d6f9644a-a32f-45d8-b5ed-be54486ec21d
Hou, Ruihua
470bdcbc-93a9-4dad-aac5-26d455c34376
Bartlett, Maeve
013f7f0e-b7c2-4435-849d-f7b452680b10
Bulters, Diederik
d6f9644a-a32f-45d8-b5ed-be54486ec21d
Hou, Ruihua
470bdcbc-93a9-4dad-aac5-26d455c34376

Bartlett, Maeve, Bulters, Diederik and Hou, Ruihua (2021) Psychological distress after subarachnoid haemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 148, [110559]. (doi:10.1016/j.jpsychores.2021.110559).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: psychological distress is a common complication in patients after Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) which often has significant impact on the prognosis. The objective of this study was to determine the pooled prevalence of anxiety symptoms and depressive symptoms in patients after SAH and identify relevant risk factors. Methods: the study adopted a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol. Multiple databases including EMBASE, Medline, PsychInfo, and Web of Science were searched for publications before 1st January 2020. Screening, data extraction, and quality assessment were undertaken following the PRISMA guidelines for preferred reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analysis. The random-effects model was used to calculate pooled prevalence rates. Meta-analysis was conducted using Comprehensive Meta-analysis software. The review protocol was registered on PROSPERO (CRD42020182594). Results: 42 studies reporting anxiety symptoms and 64 studies reporting depressive symptoms were included. The pooled short term(<3 years) and long term(≥3 years) prevalence rates of anxiety symptoms were 31.4%(95% CI: 23.6%, 40.4%) and 40.4%(95% CI: 31.6%, 49.8%), respectively, whereas the pooled short term and long term prevalence rates of depressive symptoms were 25.2%(95%CI: 17.8%, 34.5%) and 35.8%(95%CI: 28.6%, 43.6%), respectively. Gender and pre-existing psychiatric conditions were identified as potential risk factors. Conclusions: the high prevalence of anxiety symptoms and depressive symptoms after SAH highlights the need for appropriate assessment and management of psychological stress in patients after SAH. Further research is warranted to explore potential underlying mechanisms and to develop holistic interventions that incorporate understanding of both the biological and psychological impact of SAH.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 26 June 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 July 2021
Keywords: Anxiety, Depression, Meta-analysis, Subarachnoid haemorrhage, Systematic review

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 450172
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/450172
ISSN: 0022-3999
PURE UUID: a77d675f-c22f-46bc-b1e1-89714dc5cd8a
ORCID for Ruihua Hou: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6127-1478

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Jul 2021 16:48
Last modified: 15 Sep 2021 01:52

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Contributors

Author: Maeve Bartlett
Author: Diederik Bulters
Author: Ruihua Hou ORCID iD

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