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Otolith-derived field metabolic rates of myctophids (family Myctophidae) from the Scotia Sea (Southern Ocean)

Otolith-derived field metabolic rates of myctophids (family Myctophidae) from the Scotia Sea (Southern Ocean)
Otolith-derived field metabolic rates of myctophids (family Myctophidae) from the Scotia Sea (Southern Ocean)
Myctophids (family Myctophidae, commonly known as the lanternfishes) are critical components of open ocean food webs and an important part of the ocean biological carbon pump, as many species actively transport carbon to the deep ocean through their diel vertical migrations. Estimating the magnitude of myctophids’ contribution to the biological carbon pump requires knowledge of their metabolic rate. Unfortunately, data on myctophid metabolic rates are sparse, as they rarely survive being captured and placed in a respirometer. Because of this, many studies estimate myctophid metabolic rates indirectly from body mass and temperature scaling relationships, often extrapolating regressions from global datasets to regional scales. To test the validity of these estimates, we employ a newly-developed proxy for mass-specific field metabolic rate (Cresp: the proportion of metabolically derived carbon in the otolith) based on the stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of otolith aragonite. We recovered estimates of Cresp for individuals of six species of myctophids from the Scotia Sea; giving a range in Cresp values from 0.123 to 0.248. We find that ecological and physiological differences among species are better predictors of variation in Cresp values than body mass and temperature. We compared our results to estimates of metabolic rates derived from scaling relationships and from measurements of electron transport system activity (ETS). When considering myctophids as a whole, we find estimates of oxygen consumption from different methods are broadly similar, however, there are considerable discrepancies at the species level. Our study highlights the usefulness of metabolic proxies where respirometry is currently unavailable, and provides valuable information on field metabolic rates of myctophids.
lanternfish, mesopelagic, stable isotope, oxygen consumption, respiration, carbon
0171-8630
Alewijnse, Sarah, Rose
9a8ba920-8ff5-4511-a3ea-623e6e88c19d
Stowasser, Gabriele
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Saunders, Ryan
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Belcher, Anna
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Crimmen, Oliver
d872fc6e-8613-4d89-a0b8-1b08727167b0
Cooper, Natalie
4089d86c-210a-4910-a2dd-cba2932885b3
Trueman, Clive
d00d3bd6-a47b-4d47-89ae-841c3d506205
Alewijnse, Sarah, Rose
9a8ba920-8ff5-4511-a3ea-623e6e88c19d
Stowasser, Gabriele
d224bd9a-27fe-402a-bb52-c41a44b0553c
Saunders, Ryan
5a696f9b-1716-4000-bd53-9eddbbb47741
Belcher, Anna
91b81c68-d593-47d3-af02-5e8f34888262
Crimmen, Oliver
d872fc6e-8613-4d89-a0b8-1b08727167b0
Cooper, Natalie
4089d86c-210a-4910-a2dd-cba2932885b3
Trueman, Clive
d00d3bd6-a47b-4d47-89ae-841c3d506205

Alewijnse, Sarah, Rose, Stowasser, Gabriele, Saunders, Ryan, Belcher, Anna, Crimmen, Oliver, Cooper, Natalie and Trueman, Clive (2021) Otolith-derived field metabolic rates of myctophids (family Myctophidae) from the Scotia Sea (Southern Ocean). Marine Ecology Progress Series. (doi:10.3354/meps13827). (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Myctophids (family Myctophidae, commonly known as the lanternfishes) are critical components of open ocean food webs and an important part of the ocean biological carbon pump, as many species actively transport carbon to the deep ocean through their diel vertical migrations. Estimating the magnitude of myctophids’ contribution to the biological carbon pump requires knowledge of their metabolic rate. Unfortunately, data on myctophid metabolic rates are sparse, as they rarely survive being captured and placed in a respirometer. Because of this, many studies estimate myctophid metabolic rates indirectly from body mass and temperature scaling relationships, often extrapolating regressions from global datasets to regional scales. To test the validity of these estimates, we employ a newly-developed proxy for mass-specific field metabolic rate (Cresp: the proportion of metabolically derived carbon in the otolith) based on the stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of otolith aragonite. We recovered estimates of Cresp for individuals of six species of myctophids from the Scotia Sea; giving a range in Cresp values from 0.123 to 0.248. We find that ecological and physiological differences among species are better predictors of variation in Cresp values than body mass and temperature. We compared our results to estimates of metabolic rates derived from scaling relationships and from measurements of electron transport system activity (ETS). When considering myctophids as a whole, we find estimates of oxygen consumption from different methods are broadly similar, however, there are considerable discrepancies at the species level. Our study highlights the usefulness of metabolic proxies where respirometry is currently unavailable, and provides valuable information on field metabolic rates of myctophids.

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Otolith-derived field metabolic rates of myctophids (family Myctophidae) from the Scotia Sea (Southern Ocean) - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 12 July 2022.
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Supplementary Material for Alewijnse et al. 2021
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 12 June 2021
Keywords: lanternfish, mesopelagic, stable isotope, oxygen consumption, respiration, carbon

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 450358
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/450358
ISSN: 0171-8630
PURE UUID: 28a9890a-79a3-440d-87c7-3c6522a7256e

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Date deposited: 23 Jul 2021 18:14
Last modified: 21 Oct 2021 16:47

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Contributors

Author: Gabriele Stowasser
Author: Ryan Saunders
Author: Anna Belcher
Author: Oliver Crimmen
Author: Natalie Cooper
Author: Clive Trueman

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