The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Planning and optimising a digital intervention to protect older adults’ cognitive health

Planning and optimising a digital intervention to protect older adults’ cognitive health
Planning and optimising a digital intervention to protect older adults’ cognitive health
Background: by 2050 worldwide dementia prevalence is expected to triple. Affordable, scalable interventions are required to support protective behaviours such as physical activity, cognitive training and healthy eating. This paper outlines the theory-, evidence- and person-based development of ‘Active Brains’: a multi-domain digital behaviour change intervention to reduce cognitive decline amongst older adults.

Methods: during the initial planning phase, scoping reviews, consultation with PPI contributors and expert co-investigators and behavioural analysis collated and recorded evidence that was triangulated to inform provisional ‘guiding principles’ and an intervention logic model. The following optimisation phase involved qualitative think aloud and semi-structured interviews with 52 older adults with higher and lower cognitive performance scores. Data were analysed thematically and informed changes and additions to guiding principles, the behavioural analysis and the logic model which, in turn, informed changes to intervention content.

Results: scoping reviews and qualitative interviews suggested that the same intervention content may be suitable for individuals with higher and lower cognitive performance. Qualitative findings revealed that maintaining independence and enjoyment motivated engagement in intervention-targeted behaviours, whereas managing ill health was a potential barrier. Social support for engaging in such activities could provide motivation, but was not desirable for all. These findings informed development of intervention content and functionality that appeared highly acceptable amongst a sample of target users.

Conclusions: a digitally-delivered intervention with minimal support appears acceptable and potentially engaging to older adults with higher and lower levels of cognitive performance. As well as informing our own intervention development, insights obtained through this process may be useful for others working with, and developing interventions for, older adults and/or those with cognitive impairment.
behaviour change, cognitive health, dementia, digital intervention, physical activity, prevention
2055-5784
Essery, Rosie
6bf53e81-577f-4a95-ba45-11aa64d1ee53
Pollet, Sebastien
a3b6c348-04f6-48b0-a729-f047484c5e6e
Smith, Kirsten
9da65772-0efa-4267-87ff-563f9757b34e
Mowbray, Fiona
0a9e37a7-06c7-4926-95cb-af2d1eb22157
Slodkowska-Barabasz, Joanna
18182048-55ee-474c-9790-1f5b81fa585c
Denison-Day, James
49c0d012-eadc-44eb-b06c-da7714be145a
Hayter, Victoria
eb2d271d-e17b-4ef6-b761-a52f6342293a
Bradbury, Katherine
87fce0b9-d9c5-42b4-b041-bffeb4430863
Grey, Elisabeth
ac02c8bd-8bc8-4b6a-8966-e7259bcd3d1a
Western, Max
5be9f108-1eb2-4ac4-b205-897053b0e88f
Milton, Alexander MC
4125ccd8-b06f-4ec7-9e7b-0ea428209f27
Hunter, Cheryl
39f0885f-c18b-4d08-af1c-ed246bc707a6
Ferrey, Anne
38b7fff0-a408-47f5-93ad-069d2678c8d1
Muller, Andre M
c98839e7-4b3d-4cf4-b3d6-af71d6cedc9a
Stuart, Beth
626862fc-892b-4f6d-9cbb-7a8d7172b209
Mutrie, Nanette
5f11da96-324b-471b-800d-b98edb87dbe4
Griffin, Simon J.
f12ee1b9-fef5-46ab-b5a4-50b66e6c93c8
Kendrick, Tony
c697a72c-c698-469d-8ac2-f00df40583e5
Brooker, Helen
1e981a24-d4c3-4208-9254-d1d1e09f98e3
Gudgin, Bernard
e832fb17-bfdd-42ab-a9dc-7312629c743e
Phillips, Rosemary
19c8044a-0290-4861-9416-df93fadd473d
Stokes, Tom
4c63a939-5880-467a-8068-55a524e3eaf0
Niven, John
c61ef2b8-226e-4ab3-918e-484d02a3826d
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Essery, Rosie
6bf53e81-577f-4a95-ba45-11aa64d1ee53
Pollet, Sebastien
a3b6c348-04f6-48b0-a729-f047484c5e6e
Smith, Kirsten
9da65772-0efa-4267-87ff-563f9757b34e
Mowbray, Fiona
0a9e37a7-06c7-4926-95cb-af2d1eb22157
Slodkowska-Barabasz, Joanna
18182048-55ee-474c-9790-1f5b81fa585c
Denison-Day, James
49c0d012-eadc-44eb-b06c-da7714be145a
Hayter, Victoria
eb2d271d-e17b-4ef6-b761-a52f6342293a
Bradbury, Katherine
87fce0b9-d9c5-42b4-b041-bffeb4430863
Grey, Elisabeth
ac02c8bd-8bc8-4b6a-8966-e7259bcd3d1a
Western, Max
5be9f108-1eb2-4ac4-b205-897053b0e88f
Milton, Alexander MC
4125ccd8-b06f-4ec7-9e7b-0ea428209f27
Hunter, Cheryl
39f0885f-c18b-4d08-af1c-ed246bc707a6
Ferrey, Anne
38b7fff0-a408-47f5-93ad-069d2678c8d1
Muller, Andre M
c98839e7-4b3d-4cf4-b3d6-af71d6cedc9a
Stuart, Beth
626862fc-892b-4f6d-9cbb-7a8d7172b209
Mutrie, Nanette
5f11da96-324b-471b-800d-b98edb87dbe4
Griffin, Simon J.
f12ee1b9-fef5-46ab-b5a4-50b66e6c93c8
Kendrick, Tony
c697a72c-c698-469d-8ac2-f00df40583e5
Brooker, Helen
1e981a24-d4c3-4208-9254-d1d1e09f98e3
Gudgin, Bernard
e832fb17-bfdd-42ab-a9dc-7312629c743e
Phillips, Rosemary
19c8044a-0290-4861-9416-df93fadd473d
Stokes, Tom
4c63a939-5880-467a-8068-55a524e3eaf0
Niven, John
c61ef2b8-226e-4ab3-918e-484d02a3826d
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e

Essery, Rosie, Pollet, Sebastien, Smith, Kirsten, Mowbray, Fiona, Slodkowska-Barabasz, Joanna, Denison-Day, James, Hayter, Victoria, Bradbury, Katherine, Grey, Elisabeth, Western, Max, Milton, Alexander MC, Hunter, Cheryl, Ferrey, Anne, Muller, Andre M, Stuart, Beth, Mutrie, Nanette, Griffin, Simon J., Kendrick, Tony, Brooker, Helen, Gudgin, Bernard, Phillips, Rosemary, Stokes, Tom, Niven, John, Little, Paul and Yardley, Lucy (2021) Planning and optimising a digital intervention to protect older adults’ cognitive health. Pilot and Feasibility Studies, 7 (1), [158]. (doi:10.1186/s40814-021-00884-2).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: by 2050 worldwide dementia prevalence is expected to triple. Affordable, scalable interventions are required to support protective behaviours such as physical activity, cognitive training and healthy eating. This paper outlines the theory-, evidence- and person-based development of ‘Active Brains’: a multi-domain digital behaviour change intervention to reduce cognitive decline amongst older adults.

Methods: during the initial planning phase, scoping reviews, consultation with PPI contributors and expert co-investigators and behavioural analysis collated and recorded evidence that was triangulated to inform provisional ‘guiding principles’ and an intervention logic model. The following optimisation phase involved qualitative think aloud and semi-structured interviews with 52 older adults with higher and lower cognitive performance scores. Data were analysed thematically and informed changes and additions to guiding principles, the behavioural analysis and the logic model which, in turn, informed changes to intervention content.

Results: scoping reviews and qualitative interviews suggested that the same intervention content may be suitable for individuals with higher and lower cognitive performance. Qualitative findings revealed that maintaining independence and enjoyment motivated engagement in intervention-targeted behaviours, whereas managing ill health was a potential barrier. Social support for engaging in such activities could provide motivation, but was not desirable for all. These findings informed development of intervention content and functionality that appeared highly acceptable amongst a sample of target users.

Conclusions: a digitally-delivered intervention with minimal support appears acceptable and potentially engaging to older adults with higher and lower levels of cognitive performance. As well as informing our own intervention development, insights obtained through this process may be useful for others working with, and developing interventions for, older adults and/or those with cognitive impairment.

Text
Active Brains Int Dvpt manuscript amends 2 22.04.21 for pure - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (160kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 July 2021
Published date: 18 August 2021
Additional Information: Funding This work was supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) under its Programme Grants for Applied Research (Reference Number RP-PG-0615-20014). The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care. The Active Brains intervention was developed using LifeGuide software, which was partly funded by the NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre (BRC). The PROTECT study represents independent research part funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College London. This research was also supported by the NIHR Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care South West Peninsula. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, or the Department of Health and Social Care.
Keywords: behaviour change, cognitive health, dementia, digital intervention, physical activity, prevention

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 450474
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/450474
ISSN: 2055-5784
PURE UUID: 127b4c36-4c2f-4a6f-876f-899dbf294194
ORCID for Sebastien Pollet: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9924-9225
ORCID for Fiona Mowbray: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3297-4163
ORCID for Katherine Bradbury: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5513-7571
ORCID for Beth Stuart: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5432-7437
ORCID for Tony Kendrick: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1618-9381
ORCID for Lucy Yardley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3853-883X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Jul 2021 16:30
Last modified: 10 Jan 2022 02:42

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Rosie Essery
Author: Kirsten Smith
Author: Fiona Mowbray ORCID iD
Author: Victoria Hayter
Author: Elisabeth Grey
Author: Max Western
Author: Alexander MC Milton
Author: Cheryl Hunter
Author: Anne Ferrey
Author: Andre M Muller
Author: Beth Stuart ORCID iD
Author: Nanette Mutrie
Author: Simon J. Griffin
Author: Tony Kendrick ORCID iD
Author: Helen Brooker
Author: Bernard Gudgin
Author: Rosemary Phillips
Author: Tom Stokes
Author: John Niven
Author: Paul Little
Author: Lucy Yardley ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×