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Community control in the housing commons: a conceptual typology

Community control in the housing commons: a conceptual typology
Community control in the housing commons: a conceptual typology

We advance theorizing on the governance of the commons through a configurative comparative analysis (CCA) of community control in the housing commons. We focus our analysis on community land trusts (CLTs), which are increasingly recognised as a potential governance mechanism for collective access to housing provision for low-income communities. Through systematic comparative analysis of CLTs in the US and UK, we extend the existing evidence base and develop a conceptual typology of community control in the housing commons. The typology suggests that whilst some social purposes for CLTs may align with notions of the commons – enrichment of community politics, conservation of community life, or creation of participatory governance – other CLTs focus on housing provision as a means of making a broader contribution to the social economy, or as an asset-lock to enable wider provision for affordable housing. By understanding this differentiation, we challenge the assumption that design principles or governance mechanisms are sufficient for or inherently offer a singly clear route to community control, and recognise that community control is achieved through different pathways informed by the multiple configurations of dynamics between different aspects of governance, as usefully illuminated by CCA. Our approach demonstrates the value to scholarship and activism on the commons of systematic comparative analysis in order to interrogate the expansion of the commons not only in practice but in spirit.

Community control, Community land trusts, Configurative comparative analysis, Housing commons
1875-0281
291-304
Durose, Catherine
9773692b-b486-404a-8c68-53652a252e31
Richardson, Liz
c4e98c2a-9051-43f3-be61-542e4df98dc1
Rozenburg, Max
b6cc4f22-fdd2-4269-9bd8-705001dd9600
Ryan, Matt
f07cd3e8-f3d9-4681-9091-84c2df07cd54
Escobar, Oliver
dac03bfd-a470-4df9-8b92-35c8b93231c3
Durose, Catherine
9773692b-b486-404a-8c68-53652a252e31
Richardson, Liz
c4e98c2a-9051-43f3-be61-542e4df98dc1
Rozenburg, Max
b6cc4f22-fdd2-4269-9bd8-705001dd9600
Ryan, Matt
f07cd3e8-f3d9-4681-9091-84c2df07cd54
Escobar, Oliver
dac03bfd-a470-4df9-8b92-35c8b93231c3

Durose, Catherine, Richardson, Liz, Rozenburg, Max, Ryan, Matt and Escobar, Oliver (2021) Community control in the housing commons: a conceptual typology. International Journal of the Commons, 15 (1), 291-304. (doi:10.5334/ijc.1093).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We advance theorizing on the governance of the commons through a configurative comparative analysis (CCA) of community control in the housing commons. We focus our analysis on community land trusts (CLTs), which are increasingly recognised as a potential governance mechanism for collective access to housing provision for low-income communities. Through systematic comparative analysis of CLTs in the US and UK, we extend the existing evidence base and develop a conceptual typology of community control in the housing commons. The typology suggests that whilst some social purposes for CLTs may align with notions of the commons – enrichment of community politics, conservation of community life, or creation of participatory governance – other CLTs focus on housing provision as a means of making a broader contribution to the social economy, or as an asset-lock to enable wider provision for affordable housing. By understanding this differentiation, we challenge the assumption that design principles or governance mechanisms are sufficient for or inherently offer a singly clear route to community control, and recognise that community control is achieved through different pathways informed by the multiple configurations of dynamics between different aspects of governance, as usefully illuminated by CCA. Our approach demonstrates the value to scholarship and activism on the commons of systematic comparative analysis in order to interrogate the expansion of the commons not only in practice but in spirit.

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Accepted/In Press date: 25 June 2021
Published date: 17 September 2021
Additional Information: Funding Information: An earlier version of this paper was presented at the General Conference of the European Consortium on Political Research (ECPR) 2019 in Wroclaw. We thank Max Lempriere (University of Birmingham) for his research assistance. We thank John Boswell (University of Southampton), Adrian Bua (De Montfort University), Sonia Bussu (Manchester Metropolitan University), and Louise Reardon (University of Birmingham) for their useful comments on earlier drafts. We would also like to acknowledge the anonymous reviewers for their helpful and constructive comments. This research was in part supported by funding from the Universities of Birmingham and Manchester, the ESRC?s What Works Scotland programme (ES/M003922/1) and the UKRI?s Future Leaders Fellowship (MR/S032711/1). Funding Information: At its inception, the CLT was supported by an active civil society (CS) Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Author(s).
Keywords: Community control, Community land trusts, Configurative comparative analysis, Housing commons

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 450540
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/450540
ISSN: 1875-0281
PURE UUID: b5d64467-f92f-4e66-becd-4e2854b4b323
ORCID for Matt Ryan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8693-5063

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Date deposited: 03 Aug 2021 16:31
Last modified: 29 Nov 2022 02:42

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Contributors

Author: Catherine Durose
Author: Liz Richardson
Author: Max Rozenburg
Author: Matt Ryan ORCID iD
Author: Oliver Escobar

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