The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Differential relationships between parent-child DXA and pQCT bone measures: Results from the Southampton women’s survey.

Differential relationships between parent-child DXA and pQCT bone measures: Results from the Southampton women’s survey.
Differential relationships between parent-child DXA and pQCT bone measures: Results from the Southampton women’s survey.

Aim: To investigate the associations between indices of bone health in childhood and corresponding parental measures. Methods: The Southampton Women's Survey characterised 12,583 non-pregnant women aged 20–34 years; 3158 subsequently had singleton live births. In a subset, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements of bone area (BA), bone mineral content (BMC) and areal bone mineral density (aBMD) lumbar spine and total hip were obtained in the parent/offspring (aged 8–9 years) trios. Another subset of children (aged 6–7 years), and their parents, had peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT; 4% and 38% tibia) measures. Using multivariable linear regression we examined relationships between mother/father and offspring, adjusting for parental age, habitual walking speed and education; offspring age and sex; and the corresponding bone measure in the other parent (β-coefficients (95%CI) unit/unit for each bone measure). Results: Data were available for 260 trios with DXA and 99 with pQCT. There were positive associations for BA, BMC and aBMD between either parent and offspring. Mother-child associations were of greater magnitude than father-child; for example, mother-child aBMD (β = 0.26 g·cm −2/g·cm −2 (0.21,0.32)) and father-child aBMD (β = 0.16 g·cm −2/g·cm −2 (0.11,0.21)), P-difference in β = 0.007. In the subset with pQCT there was a positive association for mother-offspring 4% tibial total area (β = 0.33 mm 2/mm 2 (0.17,0.48)), but little evidence of a father-offspring association (β = −0.06 mm 2/mm 2 (−0.17,0.06)). In contrast offspring 38% cortical density was more strongly associated with this measure in fathers (β = 0.48 mg·cm −3/mg·cm −3 (0.15,0.82)) than mothers (β = 0.27 mg·cm −3/mg·cm −3 (−0.03,0.56)). In general mother-father differences were attenuated by adjustment for height. Conclusions: Whilst offspring bone measures are independently associated with those of either parent, the magnitude of the association is often greater for maternal than paternal relationships. These findings are consistent with an in utero influence on offspring growth but might also reflect genetic and/or epigenetic parent of origin effects. In an established parent-offspring cohort, associations between parent and offspring bone indices were generally greater in magnitude for mother-offspring than father-offspring relationships.

BMD, Developmental origins, Epidemiology, Mother-offspring, Osteoporosis
8756-3282
Holroyd, Christopher R.
9cf92a38-168f-4511-8a44-9ca26c4c478c
Carter, Sarah A
a5111bba-b67c-47ec-b74a-b0bcef477fe6
Crozier, Sarah
9c3595ce-45b0-44fa-8c4c-4c555e628a03
D'angelo, Stefania
13375ecd-1117-4b6e-99c0-32239f52eed6
Curtis, Elizabeth
12aba0c3-1e9e-49ef-a7e9-3247e649cdd6
Moon, Rebecca
954fb3ed-9934-4649-886d-f65944985a6b
Davies, Justin
9f18fcad-f488-4c72-ac23-c154995443a9
Ward, Kate
39bd4db1-c948-4e32-930e-7bec8deb54c7
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Inskip, Hazel
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Godfrey, Keith
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Harvey, Nicholas
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145
Holroyd, Christopher R.
9cf92a38-168f-4511-8a44-9ca26c4c478c
Carter, Sarah A
a5111bba-b67c-47ec-b74a-b0bcef477fe6
Crozier, Sarah
9c3595ce-45b0-44fa-8c4c-4c555e628a03
D'angelo, Stefania
13375ecd-1117-4b6e-99c0-32239f52eed6
Curtis, Elizabeth
12aba0c3-1e9e-49ef-a7e9-3247e649cdd6
Moon, Rebecca
954fb3ed-9934-4649-886d-f65944985a6b
Davies, Justin
9f18fcad-f488-4c72-ac23-c154995443a9
Ward, Kate
39bd4db1-c948-4e32-930e-7bec8deb54c7
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Inskip, Hazel
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Godfrey, Keith
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Harvey, Nicholas
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145

Holroyd, Christopher R., Carter, Sarah A, Crozier, Sarah, D'angelo, Stefania, Curtis, Elizabeth, Moon, Rebecca, Davies, Justin, Ward, Kate, Dennison, Elaine, Inskip, Hazel, Godfrey, Keith, Cooper, Cyrus and Harvey, Nicholas (2021) Differential relationships between parent-child DXA and pQCT bone measures: Results from the Southampton women’s survey. Bone, 153, [116134]. (doi:10.1016/j.bone.2021.116134).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aim: To investigate the associations between indices of bone health in childhood and corresponding parental measures. Methods: The Southampton Women's Survey characterised 12,583 non-pregnant women aged 20–34 years; 3158 subsequently had singleton live births. In a subset, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements of bone area (BA), bone mineral content (BMC) and areal bone mineral density (aBMD) lumbar spine and total hip were obtained in the parent/offspring (aged 8–9 years) trios. Another subset of children (aged 6–7 years), and their parents, had peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT; 4% and 38% tibia) measures. Using multivariable linear regression we examined relationships between mother/father and offspring, adjusting for parental age, habitual walking speed and education; offspring age and sex; and the corresponding bone measure in the other parent (β-coefficients (95%CI) unit/unit for each bone measure). Results: Data were available for 260 trios with DXA and 99 with pQCT. There were positive associations for BA, BMC and aBMD between either parent and offspring. Mother-child associations were of greater magnitude than father-child; for example, mother-child aBMD (β = 0.26 g·cm −2/g·cm −2 (0.21,0.32)) and father-child aBMD (β = 0.16 g·cm −2/g·cm −2 (0.11,0.21)), P-difference in β = 0.007. In the subset with pQCT there was a positive association for mother-offspring 4% tibial total area (β = 0.33 mm 2/mm 2 (0.17,0.48)), but little evidence of a father-offspring association (β = −0.06 mm 2/mm 2 (−0.17,0.06)). In contrast offspring 38% cortical density was more strongly associated with this measure in fathers (β = 0.48 mg·cm −3/mg·cm −3 (0.15,0.82)) than mothers (β = 0.27 mg·cm −3/mg·cm −3 (−0.03,0.56)). In general mother-father differences were attenuated by adjustment for height. Conclusions: Whilst offspring bone measures are independently associated with those of either parent, the magnitude of the association is often greater for maternal than paternal relationships. These findings are consistent with an in utero influence on offspring growth but might also reflect genetic and/or epigenetic parent of origin effects. In an established parent-offspring cohort, associations between parent and offspring bone indices were generally greater in magnitude for mother-offspring than father-offspring relationships.

Text
CH Parent child bone 2021_07_12 R1 clean - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 29 July 2022.
Request a copy

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 24 July 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 July 2021
Published date: December 2021
Additional Information: Acknowledgements We thank the administrative staff, research nurses and participants of the SWS for their contributions. CRH and SC are joint first author. CC and NCH are joint senior author. This work was supported by grants from Medical Research Council (MRC) [4050502589 (MRC LEU)], Bupa Foundation, British Heart Foundation, National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, University of Southampton and University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, University of Oxford and the UK Royal Osteoporosis Society Osteoporosis and Bone Research Academy. EMC has been supported by the Wellcome Trust (201268/Z/ 16/Z) and an NIHR Clinical Lectureship. KMG is supported by the Na-tional Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Senior Investigator (NF-SI- 0515-10042), the European Union (Erasmus+Programme ImpENSA 598488-EPP-1-2018-1-DE-EPPKA2-CBHE-JP) the British Heart Foun-dation (RG/15/17/3174) and the US National Institute On Aging of the National Institutes of Health (Award No. U24AG047867). The work leading to these results was supported by the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007–2013), projects EarlyNutrition, ODIN and LifeCycle under grant agreements numbers 289346, 613977 and 733206, and by the BBSRC (HDHL-Biomarkers, BB/P028179/1), as part of the ALPHABET project, supported by an award made through the ERA-Net on Biomarkers for Nutrition and Health (ERA HDHL), Horizon 2020 grant agreement number 696295.
Keywords: BMD, Developmental origins, Epidemiology, Mother-offspring, Osteoporosis

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 450700
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/450700
ISSN: 8756-3282
PURE UUID: 2e6b77a2-466f-4573-93f2-7e86de2d602e
ORCID for Sarah Crozier: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9524-1127
ORCID for Stefania D'angelo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7267-1837
ORCID for Elizabeth Curtis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5147-0550
ORCID for Kate Ward: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7034-6750
ORCID for Elaine Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961
ORCID for Hazel Inskip: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8897-1749
ORCID for Keith Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Nicholas Harvey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8194-2512

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Aug 2021 16:32
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:09

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Christopher R. Holroyd
Author: Sarah A Carter
Author: Sarah Crozier ORCID iD
Author: Stefania D'angelo ORCID iD
Author: Rebecca Moon
Author: Justin Davies
Author: Kate Ward ORCID iD
Author: Elaine Dennison ORCID iD
Author: Hazel Inskip ORCID iD
Author: Keith Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: Nicholas Harvey ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×