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Change in treatment burden among people with multimorbidity: protocol of a follow up survey and development of efficient measurement tools for primary care

Change in treatment burden among people with multimorbidity: protocol of a follow up survey and development of efficient measurement tools for primary care
Change in treatment burden among people with multimorbidity: protocol of a follow up survey and development of efficient measurement tools for primary care
Background: treatment burden is the effort required of patients to look after their health and the impact this has on their functioning and wellbeing. It is likely treatment burden changes over time as circumstances change for patients and health services. However, there are a lack of population-level studies of treatment burden change and factors associated with this change over time. Furthermore, there are currently no practical screening tools for treatment burden in time-pressured clinical settings or at population level.

Methods and analysis: this is a three-year follow-up of a cross-sectional survey of 723 people with multimorbidity (defined as three or more long-term conditions; LTCs) registered at GP practices in in Dorset, England. The survey will repeat collection of information on treatment burden (using the 10-item Multimorbidity Treatment Burden Questionnaire (MTBQ) and a novel single-item screening tool), sociodemographics, medications, LTCs, health literacy and financial resource, as at baseline. Descriptive statistics will be used to compare change in treatment burden since the baseline survey in 2019 and associations of treatment burden change will be assessed using regression methods. Diagnostic test accuracy metrics will be used to evaluate the single-item treatment burden screening tool using the MTBQ as the gold-standard. Routine primary care data (including demographics, medications, LTCs, and healthcare usage data) will be extracted from medical records for consenting participants. A forward-stepwise, likelihood-ratio logistic regression model building approach will be employed in order to assess the utility of routine data metrics in quantifying treatment burden in comparison to self-reported treatment burden using the MTBQ.

Impact: to the authors’ knowledge, this will be the first study investigating longitudinal aspects of treatment burden. Findings will improve understanding of the extent to which treatment burden changes over time for people with multimorbidity and factors contributing to this change, as well as allowing better identification of people at risk of high treatment burden.

1932-6203
Hounkpatin, Hilda
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Roderick, Paul
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Morris, James, Edward
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Harris, Scott
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Watson, Forbes
6672a257-6c65-40fb-b6f9-423f92f9f3aa
Dambha-Miller, Hajira
58961db5-31aa-460e-9394-08590c4b7ba1
Roberts, Helen
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253
Walsh, Bronagh
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Smith, Dianna
e859097c-f9f5-4fd0-8b07-59218648e726
Fraser, Simon
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ARC Wessex Treatment Burden Group
Hounkpatin, Hilda
5612e5b4-6286-48c8-b81f-e96d1148681d
Roderick, Paul
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a
Morris, James, Edward
631cdf2c-3ddf-41ef-8b74-65a1dffb1e58
Harris, Scott
19ea097b-df15-4f0f-be19-8ac42c190028
Watson, Forbes
6672a257-6c65-40fb-b6f9-423f92f9f3aa
Dambha-Miller, Hajira
58961db5-31aa-460e-9394-08590c4b7ba1
Roberts, Helen
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253
Walsh, Bronagh
5818243e-048d-4b4b-88c5-231b0e419427
Smith, Dianna
e859097c-f9f5-4fd0-8b07-59218648e726
Fraser, Simon
135884b6-8737-4e8a-a98c-5d803ac7a2dc

ARC Wessex Treatment Burden Group (2021) Change in treatment burden among people with multimorbidity: protocol of a follow up survey and development of efficient measurement tools for primary care. PLoS ONE. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: treatment burden is the effort required of patients to look after their health and the impact this has on their functioning and wellbeing. It is likely treatment burden changes over time as circumstances change for patients and health services. However, there are a lack of population-level studies of treatment burden change and factors associated with this change over time. Furthermore, there are currently no practical screening tools for treatment burden in time-pressured clinical settings or at population level.

Methods and analysis: this is a three-year follow-up of a cross-sectional survey of 723 people with multimorbidity (defined as three or more long-term conditions; LTCs) registered at GP practices in in Dorset, England. The survey will repeat collection of information on treatment burden (using the 10-item Multimorbidity Treatment Burden Questionnaire (MTBQ) and a novel single-item screening tool), sociodemographics, medications, LTCs, health literacy and financial resource, as at baseline. Descriptive statistics will be used to compare change in treatment burden since the baseline survey in 2019 and associations of treatment burden change will be assessed using regression methods. Diagnostic test accuracy metrics will be used to evaluate the single-item treatment burden screening tool using the MTBQ as the gold-standard. Routine primary care data (including demographics, medications, LTCs, and healthcare usage data) will be extracted from medical records for consenting participants. A forward-stepwise, likelihood-ratio logistic regression model building approach will be employed in order to assess the utility of routine data metrics in quantifying treatment burden in comparison to self-reported treatment burden using the MTBQ.

Impact: to the authors’ knowledge, this will be the first study investigating longitudinal aspects of treatment burden. Findings will improve understanding of the extent to which treatment burden changes over time for people with multimorbidity and factors contributing to this change, as well as allowing better identification of people at risk of high treatment burden.

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Protocol paper_CLEAN_R2
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 5 November 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 452195
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/452195
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: d45b0ffc-c425-4fc8-92f3-7398120d108e
ORCID for Paul Roderick: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9475-6850
ORCID for Hajira Dambha-Miller: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0175-443X
ORCID for Helen Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5291-1880
ORCID for Bronagh Walsh: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1008-0545
ORCID for Dianna Smith: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0650-6606
ORCID for Simon Fraser: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4172-4406

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Nov 2021 17:32
Last modified: 13 Dec 2021 03:31

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Contributors

Author: Paul Roderick ORCID iD
Author: James, Edward Morris
Author: Scott Harris
Author: Forbes Watson
Author: Helen Roberts ORCID iD
Author: Bronagh Walsh ORCID iD
Author: Dianna Smith ORCID iD
Author: Simon Fraser ORCID iD
Corporate Author: ARC Wessex Treatment Burden Group

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