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Aspects of psychopathic personality relate to lower subjective and objective professional success

Aspects of psychopathic personality relate to lower subjective and objective professional success
Aspects of psychopathic personality relate to lower subjective and objective professional success
Which aspects of psychopathic personality, if any, contribute to professional success? Previous research suggests that fearless dominance does so. Yet, it also suggests that self-centered impulsivity impairs professional success. Here, we address this differential pattern in a preregistered, multi-wave study involving a large, nationally representative sample (N = 2,969 New Zealanders). We test the (a) replicability of prior findings using a new objective measure of professional success, and (b) stability of our findings across two annual assessments from 2011 and 2012. Fearless dominance is positively associated, but self-centered impulsivity is negatively associated, with subjective professional success. Controlling for age, gender, education level, and time in the current job does not alter these associations. Further, self-centered impulsivity and coldheartedness are negatively related with objective professional success. However, only the effect of coldheartedness remains after considering demographic variables. These relations hold for predicting subjective and objective professional success one year later. Together, aspects of psychopathic personality are linked negatively to objective professional success, a finding that challenges popular beliefs about the functional benefits of psychopathy in the workplace.
Psychopathic personality, fearless dominance, occupational prestige, professional success, self-centered impulsivity
0191-8869
1-40
Eisenbarth, Hedwig
41af3dcb-da48-402b-a488-49de88e64f0c
Hart, Claire
e3db9c72-f493-439c-a358-b3b482d55103
Zubielevitch, Elena
2b197cd0-b633-4304-8c7b-08596a456e93
Keilor, Tristan
8ebb601e-6e0d-40cd-8ef5-5bbacf4588fc
Wilson, Marc
9f6e7f6e-354b-4182-abc3-de189032103c
Bulbulia, Joseph
100fd42a-8e7a-4a07-958a-c41a62bf611f
Sibley, Chris G.
a3a07aa3-6698-431d-a5a2-ccd35c613383
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2
Eisenbarth, Hedwig
41af3dcb-da48-402b-a488-49de88e64f0c
Hart, Claire
e3db9c72-f493-439c-a358-b3b482d55103
Zubielevitch, Elena
2b197cd0-b633-4304-8c7b-08596a456e93
Keilor, Tristan
8ebb601e-6e0d-40cd-8ef5-5bbacf4588fc
Wilson, Marc
9f6e7f6e-354b-4182-abc3-de189032103c
Bulbulia, Joseph
100fd42a-8e7a-4a07-958a-c41a62bf611f
Sibley, Chris G.
a3a07aa3-6698-431d-a5a2-ccd35c613383
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2

Eisenbarth, Hedwig, Hart, Claire, Zubielevitch, Elena, Keilor, Tristan, Wilson, Marc, Bulbulia, Joseph, Sibley, Chris G. and Sedikides, Constantine (2022) Aspects of psychopathic personality relate to lower subjective and objective professional success. Personality and Individual Differences, 186, 1-40, [111340]. (doi:10.1016/j.paid.2021.111340).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Which aspects of psychopathic personality, if any, contribute to professional success? Previous research suggests that fearless dominance does so. Yet, it also suggests that self-centered impulsivity impairs professional success. Here, we address this differential pattern in a preregistered, multi-wave study involving a large, nationally representative sample (N = 2,969 New Zealanders). We test the (a) replicability of prior findings using a new objective measure of professional success, and (b) stability of our findings across two annual assessments from 2011 and 2012. Fearless dominance is positively associated, but self-centered impulsivity is negatively associated, with subjective professional success. Controlling for age, gender, education level, and time in the current job does not alter these associations. Further, self-centered impulsivity and coldheartedness are negatively related with objective professional success. However, only the effect of coldheartedness remains after considering demographic variables. These relations hold for predicting subjective and objective professional success one year later. Together, aspects of psychopathic personality are linked negatively to objective professional success, a finding that challenges popular beliefs about the functional benefits of psychopathy in the workplace.

Text
Eisenbarth et al., 2021, PAID
Restricted to Repository staff only until 20 October 2023.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 October 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 October 2021
Published date: February 2022
Additional Information: Funding Information: This research was supported by a grant from the Templeton Religion Trust ( TRT0196 ). The funders have no role in NZAVS study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of scientific reports or manuscripts for publication using NZAVS data. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 Elsevier Ltd Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.
Keywords: Psychopathic personality, fearless dominance, occupational prestige, professional success, self-centered impulsivity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 452588
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/452588
ISSN: 0191-8869
PURE UUID: d4da5b17-d126-4cc2-8a3e-abe934b3a489
ORCID for Hedwig Eisenbarth: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0521-2630
ORCID for Claire Hart: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2175-2474
ORCID for Constantine Sedikides: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4036-889X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Dec 2021 11:27
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 02:12

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Contributors

Author: Hedwig Eisenbarth ORCID iD
Author: Claire Hart ORCID iD
Author: Elena Zubielevitch
Author: Tristan Keilor
Author: Marc Wilson
Author: Joseph Bulbulia
Author: Chris G. Sibley

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