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Investigating stability and tunability of quantum dot transport in silicon MOSFETs via the application of electrical stress

Investigating stability and tunability of quantum dot transport in silicon MOSFETs via the application of electrical stress
Investigating stability and tunability of quantum dot transport in silicon MOSFETs via the application of electrical stress
In this work, we experimentally investigate the impact of electrical stress on the tunability of single hole transport properties within a p-type silicon MOSFET at a temperature of T = 2 K. This is achieved by monitoring Coulomb-blockade from three disorder based quantum dots at the channel-oxide interface, which are known to lack tunability as a result of their stochastic origin. Our findings indicate that when applying gate biases between −4 V and −4.6 V, nearby charge trapping enhances Coulomb-blockade leading to a stronger quantum dot confinement that can be reversed to the initial device condition after performing a thermal cycle reset. Re-applying stress then gives rise to a predictable response from reproducible changes in the quantum dot charging characteristics with consistent charging energy increases of up to ≈50% being observed. We reach a threshold above gate biases of −4.6 V, where the performance and stability become reduced due to device degradation occurring as a product of large-scale trap generation. The results not only suggest stress as an effective technique to enhance and reset charging properties but also offer insight on how standard industrial silicon devices can be harnessed for single charge transport applications.
0022-3727
Hillier, Joseph, William
3621050b-74de-4fb7-b1ee-968965966336
Ibukuro, Kouta
b863054f-39db-4e0e-a2cb-981a86820dda
Liu, Fayong
beec7ff8-5835-4793-981b-fafd99b52549
Husain, Muhammad K
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Byers, James J
f64a1b0d-87c1-4d2f-9539-84857a6d862e
Rutt, Harvey
e09fa327-0c01-467a-9898-4e7f0cd715fc
Tomita, Isao
e4a78ed2-f525-4fb0-9711-86e2b2dd5587
Tsuchiya, Yoshishige
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Saito, Shinichi
14a5d20b-055e-4f48-9dda-267e88bd3fdc
Hillier, Joseph, William
3621050b-74de-4fb7-b1ee-968965966336
Ibukuro, Kouta
b863054f-39db-4e0e-a2cb-981a86820dda
Liu, Fayong
beec7ff8-5835-4793-981b-fafd99b52549
Husain, Muhammad K
92db1f76-6760-4cf2-8e30-5d4a602fe15b
Byers, James J
f64a1b0d-87c1-4d2f-9539-84857a6d862e
Rutt, Harvey
e09fa327-0c01-467a-9898-4e7f0cd715fc
Tomita, Isao
e4a78ed2-f525-4fb0-9711-86e2b2dd5587
Tsuchiya, Yoshishige
5a5178c6-b3a9-4e07-b9b2-9a28e49f1dc2
Saito, Shinichi
14a5d20b-055e-4f48-9dda-267e88bd3fdc

Hillier, Joseph, William, Ibukuro, Kouta, Liu, Fayong, Husain, Muhammad K, Byers, James J, Rutt, Harvey, Tomita, Isao, Tsuchiya, Yoshishige and Saito, Shinichi (2021) Investigating stability and tunability of quantum dot transport in silicon MOSFETs via the application of electrical stress. Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, 55, [105107].

Record type: Article

Abstract

In this work, we experimentally investigate the impact of electrical stress on the tunability of single hole transport properties within a p-type silicon MOSFET at a temperature of T = 2 K. This is achieved by monitoring Coulomb-blockade from three disorder based quantum dots at the channel-oxide interface, which are known to lack tunability as a result of their stochastic origin. Our findings indicate that when applying gate biases between −4 V and −4.6 V, nearby charge trapping enhances Coulomb-blockade leading to a stronger quantum dot confinement that can be reversed to the initial device condition after performing a thermal cycle reset. Re-applying stress then gives rise to a predictable response from reproducible changes in the quantum dot charging characteristics with consistent charging energy increases of up to ≈50% being observed. We reach a threshold above gate biases of −4.6 V, where the performance and stability become reduced due to device degradation occurring as a product of large-scale trap generation. The results not only suggest stress as an effective technique to enhance and reset charging properties but also offer insight on how standard industrial silicon devices can be harnessed for single charge transport applications.

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Hillier+et+al_2021_J._Phys._D _Appl._Phys._10.1088_1361-6463_ac3da9 - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
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Hillier_2022_J._Phys._D__Appl._Phys._55_105107 - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 26 November 2021
Published date: 8 December 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 453074
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/453074
ISSN: 0022-3727
PURE UUID: 42cb34b9-a15d-401f-9b1c-bb0393ef4feb
ORCID for Joseph, William Hillier: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4418-0819
ORCID for Kouta Ibukuro: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6546-8873
ORCID for Fayong Liu: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4443-9720
ORCID for Shinichi Saito: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1539-1182

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Jan 2022 17:51
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 02:20

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Contributors

Author: Joseph, William Hillier ORCID iD
Author: Kouta Ibukuro ORCID iD
Author: Fayong Liu ORCID iD
Author: Muhammad K Husain
Author: James J Byers
Author: Harvey Rutt
Author: Isao Tomita
Author: Yoshishige Tsuchiya
Author: Shinichi Saito ORCID iD

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