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Is it all about perception? A sustainability viewpoint on psychological capital and life well-being of management graduates

Is it all about perception? A sustainability viewpoint on psychological capital and life well-being of management graduates
Is it all about perception? A sustainability viewpoint on psychological capital and life well-being of management graduates

Purpose: Well-being and employability are considered important indicators of a sustainable career that must be incorporated into the system at the beginning of a job. Hence, it is essential to explore the role of positive personal resources to improve young managers' well-being. The unending ambivalence in the academic environment and the job market is detrimental to management graduates' well-being. The study aims to look into the possible intervening methods to enhance the well-being of management students during difficult times. Design/methodology/approach: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 212 management students from Kerala, India. Multi-stage random sampling was used to collect data. Structural equation modelling using IBM-AMOS was done to gain insights into the proposed relationships. Findings: The results indicated that psychological capital had a significant impact on the well-being of management students. Both perceived employability and psychological capital are positively related to life well-being. And, perceived employability mediated the relationship between psychological capital and life well-being. Research limitations/implications: The theoretical contribution comes from the application of the broaden-and-build theory and resource caravans from the conservation of resource theory as a theoretical framework to understand the positive impact of developing psychological capital among university students. The practical contribution comes from identifying a need for universities to make their campus climate more supportive of the non-academic needs of students by supporting them to become more self-reliant and enhance their positive psychological resources. Developing psychological resources of perceived employability and psychological capital is quintessential to enhance life well-being and career sustainability of early careers talent. Originality/value: This study is one of the first attempts to discern how psychological capital leads to an accumulation of psychological resources and life well-being in university students and graduates offering opportunities for career sustainability.

Higher education Institutions (HEIs), Life well-being, Management graduates, Perceived employability, Psychological capital (PsyCap)
2042-3896
M, Nimmi P.
05cf28ed-5549-4d1e-8e9d-e2b094c6759c
Joseph, George
dca177d4-1711-4477-ab78-c852685fd32a
Donald, William E.
81d72127-3ea4-463b-814b-b7863462041a
M, Nimmi P.
05cf28ed-5549-4d1e-8e9d-e2b094c6759c
Joseph, George
dca177d4-1711-4477-ab78-c852685fd32a
Donald, William E.
81d72127-3ea4-463b-814b-b7863462041a

M, Nimmi P., Joseph, George and Donald, William E. (2021) Is it all about perception? A sustainability viewpoint on psychological capital and life well-being of management graduates. Higher Education Skills and Work Based Learning. (doi:10.1108/HESWBL-01-2021-0004).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose: Well-being and employability are considered important indicators of a sustainable career that must be incorporated into the system at the beginning of a job. Hence, it is essential to explore the role of positive personal resources to improve young managers' well-being. The unending ambivalence in the academic environment and the job market is detrimental to management graduates' well-being. The study aims to look into the possible intervening methods to enhance the well-being of management students during difficult times. Design/methodology/approach: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 212 management students from Kerala, India. Multi-stage random sampling was used to collect data. Structural equation modelling using IBM-AMOS was done to gain insights into the proposed relationships. Findings: The results indicated that psychological capital had a significant impact on the well-being of management students. Both perceived employability and psychological capital are positively related to life well-being. And, perceived employability mediated the relationship between psychological capital and life well-being. Research limitations/implications: The theoretical contribution comes from the application of the broaden-and-build theory and resource caravans from the conservation of resource theory as a theoretical framework to understand the positive impact of developing psychological capital among university students. The practical contribution comes from identifying a need for universities to make their campus climate more supportive of the non-academic needs of students by supporting them to become more self-reliant and enhance their positive psychological resources. Developing psychological resources of perceived employability and psychological capital is quintessential to enhance life well-being and career sustainability of early careers talent. Originality/value: This study is one of the first attempts to discern how psychological capital leads to an accumulation of psychological resources and life well-being in university students and graduates offering opportunities for career sustainability.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 13 August 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 31 August 2021
Keywords: Higher education Institutions (HEIs), Life well-being, Management graduates, Perceived employability, Psychological capital (PsyCap)

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 453244
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/453244
ISSN: 2042-3896
PURE UUID: dfb5b9e2-c4d1-4c4b-9066-f31435ac9114

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Jan 2022 17:46
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 02:22

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Contributors

Author: Nimmi P. M
Author: George Joseph
Author: William E. Donald

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