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Parental preconception BMI trajectories from childhood to adolescence and asthma in the future offspring

Parental preconception BMI trajectories from childhood to adolescence and asthma in the future offspring
Parental preconception BMI trajectories from childhood to adolescence and asthma in the future offspring
Background
Recent evidence suggests that parental exposures before conception can increase the risk of asthma in offspring.

Objective
We investigated the association between parents' preconception body mass index (BMI) trajectories from childhood to adolescence and subsequent risk of asthma in their offspring.

Methods
Using group-based trajectory modeling from the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study, we identified BMI trajectories for index participants (parents) when aged 4 years to 15 years. Multinomial regression models adjusted for potential confounders were utilized to estimate the association between these early-life parents' BMI trajectories and asthma phenotypes in their subsequent offspring.

Results
The main analysis included 1822 parents and 4208 offspring. Four BMI trajectories from age 4 years to 15 years were identified as the best-fitting model: low (8.8%), normal (44.1%), above normal (40.2%), and high (7.0%). Associations were observed between father’s high BMI trajectory and risk of asthma in offspring before the age of 10 years (relative risk ratio [RRR] =1.70 [95% CI = 0.98-2.93]) and also asthma ever (RRR = 1.72 [95% CI = 1.00-2.97]), especially allergic asthma ever (RRR = 2.05 [95% CI = 1.12-3.72]). These associations were not mediated by offspring birth weight. No associations were observed for maternal BMI trajectories and offspring asthma phenotypes.

Conclusion
This cohort study over 6 decades of life and across 2 generations suggests that the high BMI trajectory in fathers, well before conception, increased the risk of asthma in their offspring.
0091-6749
Bowatte, Gayan
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Bui, Dinh
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Priyankara, Sajith
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Lowe, Adrian J.
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Perret, Jennifer L.
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Lodge, Caroline J.
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Hamilton, Garun S.
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Erbas, Bircan
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Thomas, Paul
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Thompson, Bruce
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Schlünssen, Vivi
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Martino, David
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Holloway, John W.
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Svanes, Cecilie
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Abramson, Michael J.
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Walters, E. Haydn
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Dharmage, Shyamali C.
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Bowatte, Gayan
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Bui, Dinh
15750bb8-eb32-48b5-ba6f-f3f0aca177cd
Priyankara, Sajith
4224b66d-5447-4e4f-9417-5ff56cc99230
Lowe, Adrian J.
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Perret, Jennifer L.
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Lodge, Caroline J.
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Hamilton, Garun S.
e51c7b9f-e5de-4291-8a50-1aba886c91c1
Erbas, Bircan
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Thomas, Paul
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Thompson, Bruce
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Schlünssen, Vivi
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Martino, David
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Holloway, John W.
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Svanes, Cecilie
4a547f80-e3d3-47b4-ae0a-2741ad93c629
Abramson, Michael J.
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Walters, E. Haydn
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Dharmage, Shyamali C.
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Bowatte, Gayan, Bui, Dinh, Priyankara, Sajith, Lowe, Adrian J., Perret, Jennifer L., Lodge, Caroline J., Hamilton, Garun S., Erbas, Bircan, Thomas, Paul, Thompson, Bruce, Schlünssen, Vivi, Martino, David, Holloway, John W., Svanes, Cecilie, Abramson, Michael J., Walters, E. Haydn and Dharmage, Shyamali C. (2022) Parental preconception BMI trajectories from childhood to adolescence and asthma in the future offspring. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. (doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2021.11.028).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background
Recent evidence suggests that parental exposures before conception can increase the risk of asthma in offspring.

Objective
We investigated the association between parents' preconception body mass index (BMI) trajectories from childhood to adolescence and subsequent risk of asthma in their offspring.

Methods
Using group-based trajectory modeling from the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study, we identified BMI trajectories for index participants (parents) when aged 4 years to 15 years. Multinomial regression models adjusted for potential confounders were utilized to estimate the association between these early-life parents' BMI trajectories and asthma phenotypes in their subsequent offspring.

Results
The main analysis included 1822 parents and 4208 offspring. Four BMI trajectories from age 4 years to 15 years were identified as the best-fitting model: low (8.8%), normal (44.1%), above normal (40.2%), and high (7.0%). Associations were observed between father’s high BMI trajectory and risk of asthma in offspring before the age of 10 years (relative risk ratio [RRR] =1.70 [95% CI = 0.98-2.93]) and also asthma ever (RRR = 1.72 [95% CI = 1.00-2.97]), especially allergic asthma ever (RRR = 2.05 [95% CI = 1.12-3.72]). These associations were not mediated by offspring birth weight. No associations were observed for maternal BMI trajectories and offspring asthma phenotypes.

Conclusion
This cohort study over 6 decades of life and across 2 generations suggests that the high BMI trajectory in fathers, well before conception, increased the risk of asthma in their offspring.

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Accepted/In Press date: 24 November 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 January 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 454350
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/454350
ISSN: 0091-6749
PURE UUID: 6dcb4206-72b1-49c9-a080-e2ba89198789
ORCID for John W. Holloway: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9998-0464

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Date deposited: 07 Feb 2022 17:55
Last modified: 08 Jan 2023 05:01

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Contributors

Author: Gayan Bowatte
Author: Dinh Bui
Author: Sajith Priyankara
Author: Adrian J. Lowe
Author: Jennifer L. Perret
Author: Caroline J. Lodge
Author: Garun S. Hamilton
Author: Bircan Erbas
Author: Paul Thomas
Author: Bruce Thompson
Author: Vivi Schlünssen
Author: David Martino
Author: Cecilie Svanes
Author: Michael J. Abramson
Author: E. Haydn Walters
Author: Shyamali C. Dharmage

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