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Self-management by older people living with cancer and multi-morbidity: a qualitative study

Self-management by older people living with cancer and multi-morbidity: a qualitative study
Self-management by older people living with cancer and multi-morbidity: a qualitative study

Purpose: over half of individuals diagnosed with cancer are aged over 70 years, and more than 75% of those with cancer report at least one other medical condition. Having multiple conditions alongside cancer in old age may lower functional status, greater likelihood of treatment complications and less favourable prognoses. This qualitative study explored how older people with long-term chronic conditions manage their health and meet their health-related goals after they have completed treatment for cancer. 

Methods: one-to-one face-to-face qualitative interviews were conducted with 8 older people and 2 informal caregivers based in the UK. Older adults were eligible to participate if they were over 70 and had completed primary cancer treatment with curative intent and had at least one other chronic health condition. A semi-structured interview schedule developed a priori based on Shippee’s cumulative complexity model was used. We aimed to explore experiences that could influence self-management, utilisation of healthcare services and health outcomes. A framework analysis was used to describe and interpret the data. 

Results: four overarching themes were identified in the analysis. These themes related to factors that influenced the everyday health-related workload and capacity of the participants. These factors included their health, resources, and opportunities, as well their motivation and sense of perceived control over their lives. 

Conclusions: fragmented healthcare systems and relationships with healthcare professionals also influenced the participants’ self-management of their health. Our findings highlight the interaction between an individuals’ needs, capacity, treatment burden, and the services and resources available to them. These findings support calls to promote person-centred care to better support older adults to manage their health.

Cancer survivorship, Complex conditions, Late effects, Multimorbidity, Older adults, Qualitative research
0941-4355
4823-4833
Corbett, Teresa
bce81837-17ae-46c3-a6b1-43a7e1f07f9c
Lee, Kellyn
4f9cd477-30bc-4e0c-ba31-a8e5d4627afc
Cummings, Amanda
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Calman, Lynn
9ae254eb-74a7-4906-9eb4-62ad99f058c1
Farrington, Naomi
ba8e905c-862b-4609-b0cc-9e27218de542
Lewis, Lucy
918f5470-d2bb-4b93-a58c-2406e115f3e9
Young, Alexandra
cd1a36bc-a2f9-4c84-9649-258f5ca7e031
Richardson, Alison
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Foster, Claire
00786ac1-bd47-4aeb-a0e2-40e058695b73
Bridges, Jackie
57e80ebe-ee5f-4219-9bbc-43215e8363cd
Corbett, Teresa
bce81837-17ae-46c3-a6b1-43a7e1f07f9c
Lee, Kellyn
4f9cd477-30bc-4e0c-ba31-a8e5d4627afc
Cummings, Amanda
7c5f6bd2-979b-456d-9368-8edd13c06691
Calman, Lynn
9ae254eb-74a7-4906-9eb4-62ad99f058c1
Farrington, Naomi
ba8e905c-862b-4609-b0cc-9e27218de542
Lewis, Lucy
918f5470-d2bb-4b93-a58c-2406e115f3e9
Young, Alexandra
cd1a36bc-a2f9-4c84-9649-258f5ca7e031
Richardson, Alison
3db30680-aa47-43a5-b54d-62d10ece17b7
Foster, Claire
00786ac1-bd47-4aeb-a0e2-40e058695b73
Bridges, Jackie
57e80ebe-ee5f-4219-9bbc-43215e8363cd

Corbett, Teresa, Lee, Kellyn, Cummings, Amanda, Calman, Lynn, Farrington, Naomi, Lewis, Lucy, Young, Alexandra, Richardson, Alison, Foster, Claire and Bridges, Jackie (2022) Self-management by older people living with cancer and multi-morbidity: a qualitative study. Supportive Care in Cancer, 30 (6), 4823-4833. (doi:10.1007/s00520-022-06892-z).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose: over half of individuals diagnosed with cancer are aged over 70 years, and more than 75% of those with cancer report at least one other medical condition. Having multiple conditions alongside cancer in old age may lower functional status, greater likelihood of treatment complications and less favourable prognoses. This qualitative study explored how older people with long-term chronic conditions manage their health and meet their health-related goals after they have completed treatment for cancer. 

Methods: one-to-one face-to-face qualitative interviews were conducted with 8 older people and 2 informal caregivers based in the UK. Older adults were eligible to participate if they were over 70 and had completed primary cancer treatment with curative intent and had at least one other chronic health condition. A semi-structured interview schedule developed a priori based on Shippee’s cumulative complexity model was used. We aimed to explore experiences that could influence self-management, utilisation of healthcare services and health outcomes. A framework analysis was used to describe and interpret the data. 

Results: four overarching themes were identified in the analysis. These themes related to factors that influenced the everyday health-related workload and capacity of the participants. These factors included their health, resources, and opportunities, as well their motivation and sense of perceived control over their lives. 

Conclusions: fragmented healthcare systems and relationships with healthcare professionals also influenced the participants’ self-management of their health. Our findings highlight the interaction between an individuals’ needs, capacity, treatment burden, and the services and resources available to them. These findings support calls to promote person-centred care to better support older adults to manage their health.

Text
Self-management by older people living with cancer and multi-morbidity - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 11 February 2023.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 31 January 2022
e-pub ahead of print date: 11 February 2022
Published date: 11 February 2022
Additional Information: Funding Information: This research was funded by National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) ARC Wessex. Alison Richardson is a NIHR Senior Investigator. Naomi Farrington is funded by a NIHR Clinical Lectureship (ICA-CL-2015–01-003). The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care.
Keywords: Cancer survivorship, Complex conditions, Late effects, Multimorbidity, Older adults, Qualitative research

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 455194
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/455194
ISSN: 0941-4355
PURE UUID: 99885791-fcd9-45e2-850a-845581b6d2f5
ORCID for Teresa Corbett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5620-5377
ORCID for Amanda Cummings: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5743-2774
ORCID for Lynn Calman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9964-6017
ORCID for Alison Richardson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3127-5755
ORCID for Claire Foster: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4703-8378
ORCID for Jackie Bridges: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6776-736X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Mar 2022 17:54
Last modified: 19 Oct 2022 01:47

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Contributors

Author: Teresa Corbett ORCID iD
Author: Kellyn Lee
Author: Amanda Cummings ORCID iD
Author: Lynn Calman ORCID iD
Author: Lucy Lewis
Author: Alexandra Young
Author: Claire Foster ORCID iD
Author: Jackie Bridges ORCID iD

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