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Creative Work and Artificial Intelligence: Imaginaries, Assemblages and Portfolios

Creative Work and Artificial Intelligence: Imaginaries, Assemblages and Portfolios
Creative Work and Artificial Intelligence: Imaginaries, Assemblages and Portfolios
This article analyses how the impacts of AI technologies on creative work have been identified and constructed. The concept of imaginaries is used as a methodological and analytical approach to analyse a variety of grey literature sources published in the UK. The analysis highlights three interconnecting risk imaginaries in which creative occupations are differentiated from other occupations – they are safe and/or are being complemented, but are not being replaced by automation. The construction and implications of these imaginaries are questioned in two ways. Firstly, the concept of assemblages highlights the everyday role of AI technologies in creative production. Secondly, analysis of portfolio working and multiple job holding problematises the notion of safe creative occupations. This article argues that the relationship between AI technologies and creative work can be partly understood as enhancing creative production and the opportunities for creative work, and partly understood in terms of uncreative production and non-creative work.
1444-3775
94-113
Ashton, Daniel
b267eae4-7bdb-4fe3-9267-5ebad36e86f7
Ashton, Daniel
b267eae4-7bdb-4fe3-9267-5ebad36e86f7

Ashton, Daniel (2022) Creative Work and Artificial Intelligence: Imaginaries, Assemblages and Portfolios. Transformations, 36, 94-113, [7].

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article analyses how the impacts of AI technologies on creative work have been identified and constructed. The concept of imaginaries is used as a methodological and analytical approach to analyse a variety of grey literature sources published in the UK. The analysis highlights three interconnecting risk imaginaries in which creative occupations are differentiated from other occupations – they are safe and/or are being complemented, but are not being replaced by automation. The construction and implications of these imaginaries are questioned in two ways. Firstly, the concept of assemblages highlights the everyday role of AI technologies in creative production. Secondly, analysis of portfolio working and multiple job holding problematises the notion of safe creative occupations. This article argues that the relationship between AI technologies and creative work can be partly understood as enhancing creative production and the opportunities for creative work, and partly understood in terms of uncreative production and non-creative work.

Text
Ashton, D. (2022) Creative Work and Artificial Intelligence - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 13 December 2021
Published date: 15 March 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 455635
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/455635
ISSN: 1444-3775
PURE UUID: 77ab095a-7d15-485e-afa6-e56ded553a3a
ORCID for Daniel Ashton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3120-1783

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Date deposited: 29 Mar 2022 16:48
Last modified: 01 Apr 2022 01:45

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