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Use of antibiotics for acute sore throat and tonsillitis in primary care

Use of antibiotics for acute sore throat and tonsillitis in primary care
Use of antibiotics for acute sore throat and tonsillitis in primary care
Antibiotics are commonly prescribed for sore throat in primary care, yet are often of limited benefit.1 They are commonly associated with adverse effects, and contribute towards healthcare costs and antibiotic resistance at both the global and individual level.1 Prescribing antibiotics also reinforces patients’ belief in the need for antibiotics, and increases the chance of re-attendance in the future.2

With a view to helping clinicians optimise antibiotic use, this article summarises evidence concerning the aetiology and natural history of sore throat, incidence of complications, and the use of clinical prediction tools, and compares the outcomes of different antibiotic prescription strategies (no, immediate, and delayed antibiotics), as well as patients’ views on these approaches.
0960-1643
136-137
Wilcox, Christopher R.
1bd41dc8-f1d9-406f-a412-ba6f330cf61a
Moore, Michael
1be81dad-7120-45f0-bbed-f3b0cc0cfe99
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Wilcox, Christopher R.
1bd41dc8-f1d9-406f-a412-ba6f330cf61a
Moore, Michael
1be81dad-7120-45f0-bbed-f3b0cc0cfe99
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777

Wilcox, Christopher R., Moore, Michael and Little, Paul (2022) Use of antibiotics for acute sore throat and tonsillitis in primary care. The British journal of general practice : the journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners, 72 (716), 136-137. (doi:10.3399/bjgp22X718793).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Antibiotics are commonly prescribed for sore throat in primary care, yet are often of limited benefit.1 They are commonly associated with adverse effects, and contribute towards healthcare costs and antibiotic resistance at both the global and individual level.1 Prescribing antibiotics also reinforces patients’ belief in the need for antibiotics, and increases the chance of re-attendance in the future.2

With a view to helping clinicians optimise antibiotic use, this article summarises evidence concerning the aetiology and natural history of sore throat, incidence of complications, and the use of clinical prediction tools, and compares the outcomes of different antibiotic prescription strategies (no, immediate, and delayed antibiotics), as well as patients’ views on these approaches.

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Abx for tonsillitis_BJGP_R1 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 November 2021
Published date: 24 February 2022
Additional Information: Funding Christopher R Wilcox is an Academic Clinical Fellow in general practice funded by the National Institute for Health Research. No specific funding was obtained for the writing of this article.

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 456527
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/456527
ISSN: 0960-1643
PURE UUID: bbc1f475-c41a-42b7-a43e-05674931ab27
ORCID for Michael Moore: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5127-4509

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 May 2022 17:04
Last modified: 05 May 2022 01:39

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Contributors

Author: Christopher R. Wilcox
Author: Michael Moore ORCID iD
Author: Paul Little

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