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Moving our care home: A qualitative study of the views and experiences of residents, relatives and staff

Moving our care home: A qualitative study of the views and experiences of residents, relatives and staff
Moving our care home: A qualitative study of the views and experiences of residents, relatives and staff
Introduction: Involuntary relocation when care homes close can be detrimental to residents’ health and well-being and is associated with increased mortality. There is little formal evidence to support whether planning can mitigate the impact of such moves. This study aimed to understand the experiences of a whole care home relocation where staff and residents relocated together using existing published guidance.
Methods: A longitudinal qualitative research study using individual face-to-face semi-structured interviews was conducted between August 2018 and August 2019. Baseline interviews were conducted 6–8 weeks after relocation with follow-up interviews 10–12 months later. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using framework analysis.
Results: 27 interviews were conducted; 19 baseline interviews (4 residents, 7 family members, 8 staff) and 8 follow-up interviews (2 residents, 2 family members, 4 staff). Participants’ feelings about the relocation were mixed: some reported apprehension before the move but others excitement. Residents and families felt variably involved in planning the move, whereas staff expressed lack of involvement. Time, family support and continuity of care helped participants settle in. The new environment shaped participants’ experiences and abilities to adjust, especially the lack of a homely feeling with the new home, the larger size and changes in staff organisation and management.
Conclusions: Despite implementation of existing guidance, relocation was still challenging for residents, staff and family members. Future relocations should increase involvement of staff in the planning and design of the home; offer continuous support to those involved; and ensure continuity of care and management style.
care home, older, qualitative, relocation, resident
1748-3735
Ibrahim, Kinda
54f027ad-0599-4dd4-bdbf-b9307841a294
Baron, Sophie
41a9fe36-6e67-4411-9012-8be4a82b2e12
Lathlean, Judith
98a74375-c265-47d2-b75b-5f0f3e14c1a9
Bridges, Jackie
57e80ebe-ee5f-4219-9bbc-43215e8363cd
Mcgrath, Nuala
b75c0232-24ec-443f-93a9-69e9e12dc961
Roberts, Helen C.
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253
Ibrahim, Kinda
54f027ad-0599-4dd4-bdbf-b9307841a294
Baron, Sophie
41a9fe36-6e67-4411-9012-8be4a82b2e12
Lathlean, Judith
98a74375-c265-47d2-b75b-5f0f3e14c1a9
Bridges, Jackie
57e80ebe-ee5f-4219-9bbc-43215e8363cd
Mcgrath, Nuala
b75c0232-24ec-443f-93a9-69e9e12dc961
Roberts, Helen C.
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253

Ibrahim, Kinda, Baron, Sophie, Lathlean, Judith, Bridges, Jackie, Mcgrath, Nuala and Roberts, Helen C. (2022) Moving our care home: A qualitative study of the views and experiences of residents, relatives and staff. International Journal of Older People Nursing, [e12466]. (doi:10.1111/opn.12466).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction: Involuntary relocation when care homes close can be detrimental to residents’ health and well-being and is associated with increased mortality. There is little formal evidence to support whether planning can mitigate the impact of such moves. This study aimed to understand the experiences of a whole care home relocation where staff and residents relocated together using existing published guidance.
Methods: A longitudinal qualitative research study using individual face-to-face semi-structured interviews was conducted between August 2018 and August 2019. Baseline interviews were conducted 6–8 weeks after relocation with follow-up interviews 10–12 months later. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using framework analysis.
Results: 27 interviews were conducted; 19 baseline interviews (4 residents, 7 family members, 8 staff) and 8 follow-up interviews (2 residents, 2 family members, 4 staff). Participants’ feelings about the relocation were mixed: some reported apprehension before the move but others excitement. Residents and families felt variably involved in planning the move, whereas staff expressed lack of involvement. Time, family support and continuity of care helped participants settle in. The new environment shaped participants’ experiences and abilities to adjust, especially the lack of a homely feeling with the new home, the larger size and changes in staff organisation and management.
Conclusions: Despite implementation of existing guidance, relocation was still challenging for residents, staff and family members. Future relocations should increase involvement of staff in the planning and design of the home; offer continuous support to those involved; and ensure continuity of care and management style.

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Moving our care home a qualitative study of the views and experiences - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 18 March 2022
Published date: 18 April 2022
Additional Information: Funding Information: The study received support and funding from the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR), Collaboration in Leadership of Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) Wessex and NIHR Applied Research Collaboration (ARC) Wessex. KI and H.C.R receive support from the NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre. NMcG is a recipient of an NIHR Global Health Research Professorship award (Ref: RP‐2017‐08‐ST2‐008). The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, or the Department of Health and Social Care. Publisher Copyright: © 2022 The Authors. International Journal of Older People Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright: Copyright 2022 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.
Keywords: care home, older, qualitative, relocation, resident

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 457332
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/457332
ISSN: 1748-3735
PURE UUID: 417338be-1452-4bf3-9ce8-6cb8355d598e
ORCID for Kinda Ibrahim: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5709-3867
ORCID for Jackie Bridges: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6776-736X
ORCID for Nuala Mcgrath: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1039-0159
ORCID for Helen C. Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5291-1880

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Date deposited: 01 Jun 2022 16:41
Last modified: 09 Nov 2022 02:46

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Contributors

Author: Kinda Ibrahim ORCID iD
Author: Sophie Baron
Author: Judith Lathlean
Author: Jackie Bridges ORCID iD
Author: Nuala Mcgrath ORCID iD

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