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Medical history, medication use and physical activity in adults in their eighth and ninth decade of life in the Hertfordshire Cohort Study

Medical history, medication use and physical activity in adults in their eighth and ninth decade of life in the Hertfordshire Cohort Study
Medical history, medication use and physical activity in adults in their eighth and ninth decade of life in the Hertfordshire Cohort Study
While there are many known health benefits to maintained physical activity levels in late adulthood, there have been very few studies that have considered relationships between morbidity profile and physical activity in the eighth decade of life. We studied 1097 participants, 555 men and 542 women from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study, a UK community based sample. Validated questionnaire based data were used to relate self-reported physical activity (PA) levels to medical history, and medication use. Regression analyses were adjusted for age, BMI, smoker status, alcohol consumption. The mean (SD) age of participants in the study was 80.2 (2.7) years for men and 80.2 (2.6) for women. A higher proportion of men (33.7 %) than women (24 %) were in the high activity score group. 20.8 % of female participants and 22.6 % male participants reported having no comorbid disease; 10.5 % men and 8.4 % women were taking no medication. Higher number of chronic conditions was associated with lower levels of PA [men (OR 0.73, 95 % CI 0.63-0.84, p<0.001); women (OR 0.74, 95 % CI 0.64-0.86, p<0.001)] as was being prescribed a higher number of medications [men (OR 0.88, 95 % CI 0.84-0.93, p<0.001); women (OR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.82-0.91, p<0.001)]. All these associations remained robust following adjustments. Strong relationships were seen in both sexes between PA and taking medication for disorders of the central nervous system and gastrointestinal system, with relationships generally stronger in men. We have observed relationships between comorbid medical history and medication use with physical activity in a cohort of community dwelling older adults. These highlight the need to consider medical history when considering how best to optimize PA in older adults.
695-703
Bevilacqua, Gregorio
e93e3b18-7d1e-4da5-9fcd-e6b4637e1c2e
Zhang, Jean
437abe90-46ac-46de-8183-042c36ed3398
Parsons, Camille
9730e5c3-0382-4ed7-8eaa-6932ab09ec15
Laskou, Faidra
3959d6e2-ccfa-4d97-8311-16f27b893365
Fuggle, Nicholas
9ab0c81a-ac67-41c4-8860-23e0fdb1a900
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Bevilacqua, Gregorio
e93e3b18-7d1e-4da5-9fcd-e6b4637e1c2e
Zhang, Jean
437abe90-46ac-46de-8183-042c36ed3398
Parsons, Camille
9730e5c3-0382-4ed7-8eaa-6932ab09ec15
Laskou, Faidra
3959d6e2-ccfa-4d97-8311-16f27b893365
Fuggle, Nicholas
9ab0c81a-ac67-41c4-8860-23e0fdb1a900
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1

Bevilacqua, Gregorio, Zhang, Jean, Parsons, Camille, Laskou, Faidra, Fuggle, Nicholas, Cooper, Cyrus and Dennison, Elaine (2022) Medical history, medication use and physical activity in adults in their eighth and ninth decade of life in the Hertfordshire Cohort Study. Experimental & Clinical Sciences Journal, 21, 695-703. (doi:10.17179/excli2022-4874).

Record type: Article

Abstract

While there are many known health benefits to maintained physical activity levels in late adulthood, there have been very few studies that have considered relationships between morbidity profile and physical activity in the eighth decade of life. We studied 1097 participants, 555 men and 542 women from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study, a UK community based sample. Validated questionnaire based data were used to relate self-reported physical activity (PA) levels to medical history, and medication use. Regression analyses were adjusted for age, BMI, smoker status, alcohol consumption. The mean (SD) age of participants in the study was 80.2 (2.7) years for men and 80.2 (2.6) for women. A higher proportion of men (33.7 %) than women (24 %) were in the high activity score group. 20.8 % of female participants and 22.6 % male participants reported having no comorbid disease; 10.5 % men and 8.4 % women were taking no medication. Higher number of chronic conditions was associated with lower levels of PA [men (OR 0.73, 95 % CI 0.63-0.84, p<0.001); women (OR 0.74, 95 % CI 0.64-0.86, p<0.001)] as was being prescribed a higher number of medications [men (OR 0.88, 95 % CI 0.84-0.93, p<0.001); women (OR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.82-0.91, p<0.001)]. All these associations remained robust following adjustments. Strong relationships were seen in both sexes between PA and taking medication for disorders of the central nervous system and gastrointestinal system, with relationships generally stronger in men. We have observed relationships between comorbid medical history and medication use with physical activity in a cohort of community dwelling older adults. These highlight the need to consider medical history when considering how best to optimize PA in older adults.

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Accepted/In Press date: 12 April 2022
e-pub ahead of print date: 18 April 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 457641
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/457641
PURE UUID: 1c6585ed-3996-453f-a69d-16d171070d3f
ORCID for Gregorio Bevilacqua: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7819-1482
ORCID for Faidra Laskou: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8481-6343
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Elaine Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961

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Date deposited: 14 Jun 2022 16:50
Last modified: 19 Aug 2022 04:01

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Contributors

Author: Gregorio Bevilacqua ORCID iD
Author: Jean Zhang
Author: Camille Parsons
Author: Faidra Laskou ORCID iD
Author: Nicholas Fuggle
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: Elaine Dennison ORCID iD

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