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Is regular weight bearing physical activity throughout the lifecourse associated with better bone health in late adulthood?

Is regular weight bearing physical activity throughout the lifecourse associated with better bone health in late adulthood?
Is regular weight bearing physical activity throughout the lifecourse associated with better bone health in late adulthood?

We considered how weight-bearing physical activity (WBPA) through the lifecourse related to bone health in late adulthood in the Hertfordshire Cohort Study (HCS), a cohort of community dwelling adults born 1931–9, to identify sex-specific differences and periods critical for optimal bone health. Available questionnaire data from 258 participants (128 men and 130 women) included current reported lifestyle factors (including physical activity) and WBPA, coded as participation in WBPA aged < 18 years; aged 18–29 years; aged 30–49 years and aged ≥ 50 years. Responses were recorded as none/once a month/once a week/> once a week. Hip bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using a Lunar Prodigy DXA scanner. The mean age was 75.4 (SD 2.5) years in men and 75.7 (SD 2.6) years in women. Men reported significantly higher levels of past WBPA aged < 18 years (p = 0.006) and aged 18–29 years than women (p < 0.001). We observed greater BMD at total hip in women who reported regular WBPA at ages 18–29 years (p = 0.02) and 30–49 years (p = 0.02) compared with those who reported no WBPA (p = 0.019), after adjustment for confounders including current activity levels. In this cohort of older adults, recalled regular WBPA around the time of peak bone mass acquisition was less common in women than men, but associated with higher hip BMD in women in late adulthood.

BMD, Lifecourse, Physical activity, Weight bearing
0171-967X
279-287
Zhang, Jean
437abe90-46ac-46de-8183-042c36ed3398
Parsons, Camille
9730e5c3-0382-4ed7-8eaa-6932ab09ec15
Fuggle, Nicholas
9ab0c81a-ac67-41c4-8860-23e0fdb1a900
Ward, Kate
39bd4db1-c948-4e32-930e-7bec8deb54c7
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Zhang, Jean
437abe90-46ac-46de-8183-042c36ed3398
Parsons, Camille
9730e5c3-0382-4ed7-8eaa-6932ab09ec15
Fuggle, Nicholas
9ab0c81a-ac67-41c4-8860-23e0fdb1a900
Ward, Kate
39bd4db1-c948-4e32-930e-7bec8deb54c7
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1

Zhang, Jean, Parsons, Camille, Fuggle, Nicholas, Ward, Kate, Cooper, Cyrus and Dennison, Elaine (2022) Is regular weight bearing physical activity throughout the lifecourse associated with better bone health in late adulthood? Calcified Tissue International, 111 (3), 279-287. (doi:10.1007/s00223-022-00995-9).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We considered how weight-bearing physical activity (WBPA) through the lifecourse related to bone health in late adulthood in the Hertfordshire Cohort Study (HCS), a cohort of community dwelling adults born 1931–9, to identify sex-specific differences and periods critical for optimal bone health. Available questionnaire data from 258 participants (128 men and 130 women) included current reported lifestyle factors (including physical activity) and WBPA, coded as participation in WBPA aged < 18 years; aged 18–29 years; aged 30–49 years and aged ≥ 50 years. Responses were recorded as none/once a month/once a week/> once a week. Hip bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using a Lunar Prodigy DXA scanner. The mean age was 75.4 (SD 2.5) years in men and 75.7 (SD 2.6) years in women. Men reported significantly higher levels of past WBPA aged < 18 years (p = 0.006) and aged 18–29 years than women (p < 0.001). We observed greater BMD at total hip in women who reported regular WBPA at ages 18–29 years (p = 0.02) and 30–49 years (p = 0.02) compared with those who reported no WBPA (p = 0.019), after adjustment for confounders including current activity levels. In this cohort of older adults, recalled regular WBPA around the time of peak bone mass acquisition was less common in women than men, but associated with higher hip BMD in women in late adulthood.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 25 May 2022
e-pub ahead of print date: 17 June 2022
Published date: September 2022
Additional Information: Publisher Copyright: © 2022, The Author(s).
Keywords: BMD, Lifecourse, Physical activity, Weight bearing

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 457849
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/457849
ISSN: 0171-967X
PURE UUID: 32d51d67-3674-4849-86c8-0cd5a9c5ceb1
ORCID for Nicholas Fuggle: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5463-2255
ORCID for Kate Ward: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7034-6750
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Elaine Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961

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Date deposited: 20 Jun 2022 16:51
Last modified: 19 Dec 2023 03:02

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Contributors

Author: Jean Zhang
Author: Camille Parsons
Author: Nicholas Fuggle ORCID iD
Author: Kate Ward ORCID iD
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: Elaine Dennison ORCID iD

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