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The vibration and acoustic properties of pipes with squeeze film and some friction damping systems

The vibration and acoustic properties of pipes with squeeze film and some friction damping systems
The vibration and acoustic properties of pipes with squeeze film and some friction damping systems

This study was motivated by the need to decrease the noise radiation and vibration of pipework in power plants, particularly at elevated temperature. A thin circular cylindrical shell has been studied theoretically. The exact solutions for natural frequencies of the symmetrical and anti-symmetrical modes for cylindrical shell vibration have been derived in matrix form. Using this theory, numerical results for natural frequencies and mode shapes with free-free, clamped-free and clamped-clamped boundary conditions have been evaluated. Based upon studies of the thin cylindrical shell theory and the physical phenomenon of air film damping of two parallel plates, the theory for predicting the loss factor of an annular double pipe damping system with a very small air gap has been developed. Flugge's thin shell equations of motion and the Navier-Stokes equation for viscous fluid were employed in the analysis. The fluid motion was expressed in terms of shell displacement by using a travelling wave type solution. The solutions gave the fluid velocity profiles and stresses in the clearance between two cylindrical, concentric shells. According to the definition of energy dissipated in the fluid, an equation was derived for predicting the loss factor of the whole damping system. Based on the principle of similarity, an optimum design for a system generating squeeze film damping in pipes has been made. The theory was then extended to study the damping caused by various kinds of viscous fluid in the gap between the two annular structures. Experiments have been carried out to investigate the loss factor of the double pipe system with in-phase and out-of-phase modes of vibration. Friction damping has been studied experimentally on a thin-walledpipe with a coiled steel spring or wire rope attached or with a mineral wool wrapping. Both flexural and longitudinal vibrations were examined in the experiments. This study included an experimental investigation of reduction of internally generated high levels noise through a pipe wall, and the sound transmission losses of pipes with a coiled spring friction damper or wire rope and conventional lagging were measured. The transmission losses of a double pipe system with air or oil in the gap were also measured.

University of Southampton
Li, Meng
da183dfd-ecf1-47a1-ba85-418b42f7f224
Li, Meng
da183dfd-ecf1-47a1-ba85-418b42f7f224

Li, Meng (1991) The vibration and acoustic properties of pipes with squeeze film and some friction damping systems. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This study was motivated by the need to decrease the noise radiation and vibration of pipework in power plants, particularly at elevated temperature. A thin circular cylindrical shell has been studied theoretically. The exact solutions for natural frequencies of the symmetrical and anti-symmetrical modes for cylindrical shell vibration have been derived in matrix form. Using this theory, numerical results for natural frequencies and mode shapes with free-free, clamped-free and clamped-clamped boundary conditions have been evaluated. Based upon studies of the thin cylindrical shell theory and the physical phenomenon of air film damping of two parallel plates, the theory for predicting the loss factor of an annular double pipe damping system with a very small air gap has been developed. Flugge's thin shell equations of motion and the Navier-Stokes equation for viscous fluid were employed in the analysis. The fluid motion was expressed in terms of shell displacement by using a travelling wave type solution. The solutions gave the fluid velocity profiles and stresses in the clearance between two cylindrical, concentric shells. According to the definition of energy dissipated in the fluid, an equation was derived for predicting the loss factor of the whole damping system. Based on the principle of similarity, an optimum design for a system generating squeeze film damping in pipes has been made. The theory was then extended to study the damping caused by various kinds of viscous fluid in the gap between the two annular structures. Experiments have been carried out to investigate the loss factor of the double pipe system with in-phase and out-of-phase modes of vibration. Friction damping has been studied experimentally on a thin-walledpipe with a coiled steel spring or wire rope attached or with a mineral wool wrapping. Both flexural and longitudinal vibrations were examined in the experiments. This study included an experimental investigation of reduction of internally generated high levels noise through a pipe wall, and the sound transmission losses of pipes with a coiled spring friction damper or wire rope and conventional lagging were measured. The transmission losses of a double pipe system with air or oil in the gap were also measured.

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Published date: 1991

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 460609
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/460609
PURE UUID: 4542eb69-c512-402a-b05f-93edb37086b8

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Date deposited: 04 Jul 2022 18:25
Last modified: 04 Jul 2022 19:35

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Author: Meng Li

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