The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

A model for the coordination of mobile processes

A model for the coordination of mobile processes
A model for the coordination of mobile processes

Coordination is an important part of any computer program. As well as performing computation, applications need to interact with their environment (for example, reading a file from a disk, displaying information to a user). In distributed applications, processes that together make up the overall program also need to coordinate amongst themselves. Such coordination includes synchronisation and exchange of data.

Allowing processes to be mobile, where they are able to migrate around a network of nodes, allows novel solutions to be programmed where alternatives with static networks of processes would be inefficient or impossible to implement. For example, one method of finding "interesting" data on a network would be for a client machine to read the data off a variety of servers, and perform the filtering locally. A mobile solution could be to migrate processes to the servers, where they would query the data locally, migrating back to the client with the results. If the filter processes are small, and the databases large, this would result in reduced network usage and decreased search time.

Coordination becomes problematic in the presence of mobility. If two processes are allowed to migrate around a network, it becomes difficult to maintain connectivity between them.

This thesis explores how a set of interacting mobile processes may coordinate their activities. By abstracting away from physical networks to a model based on channels, distributed applications designers need not be aware of where processes are executing; two processes will always be able to communicate if they have access to a common channel.

University of Southampton
Berrington, Neil
Berrington, Neil

Berrington, Neil (1998) A model for the coordination of mobile processes. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Coordination is an important part of any computer program. As well as performing computation, applications need to interact with their environment (for example, reading a file from a disk, displaying information to a user). In distributed applications, processes that together make up the overall program also need to coordinate amongst themselves. Such coordination includes synchronisation and exchange of data.

Allowing processes to be mobile, where they are able to migrate around a network of nodes, allows novel solutions to be programmed where alternatives with static networks of processes would be inefficient or impossible to implement. For example, one method of finding "interesting" data on a network would be for a client machine to read the data off a variety of servers, and perform the filtering locally. A mobile solution could be to migrate processes to the servers, where they would query the data locally, migrating back to the client with the results. If the filter processes are small, and the databases large, this would result in reduced network usage and decreased search time.

Coordination becomes problematic in the presence of mobility. If two processes are allowed to migrate around a network, it becomes difficult to maintain connectivity between them.

This thesis explores how a set of interacting mobile processes may coordinate their activities. By abstracting away from physical networks to a model based on channels, distributed applications designers need not be aware of where processes are executing; two processes will always be able to communicate if they have access to a common channel.

Text
895418.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
Download (8MB)

More information

Published date: 1998

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 464958
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/464958
PURE UUID: 32b110e4-5573-4f08-b653-6b5a50c10915

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Jul 2022 00:13
Last modified: 05 Jul 2022 03:46

Export record

Contributors

Author: Neil Berrington

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×